Windrunner Pets--short and sweet...a heart-full of happiness at your feet!

This is to (hopefully) answer many of your questions-maybe even before you know you will want to ask!  If you find any mistakes, please let me know.  First is the kitten info, followed by the puppy info. 

Kitten Info:

Here is some info I recently compiled that will hopefully answer any questions you may have about my kitties.  I hope you find it helpful (ahead of when you would think of these questions!), and I hope you don't overload on information!  
You can always call or email me if you have more questions, or don't understand something in this "boatload" of info!     

Thanks a bunch,
Charlotte


My kitten package includes:

They come with their 1st kitten shot (or more if old enough) & 2 (or 3) wormings, Revolution (or Stronghold-sold by petbucket.com and saves you 30%) for fleas/ticks/ear mites/roundworms/heartworm, a soft blanket, 3 toys, a bag of xlnt food (Taste of the Wild), clean ears, trimmed nails, a shot record, and a 1-yr. congenital health guarantee.  Full TICA registration papers can be ordered on any kitten for $200 more.  Copies of parents' TICA papers and pedigrees are available.  (I have 5 generation pedigrees on many of the parents).  
>^..^<


Here are some web sites that may be useful to some folks:  


Picking a name for your kitty (or puppy):  

http://www.greatcatnames.com/pages/browse.php
OR:
http://worldsbestcatnames.com/catnamesm.html  
OR:
http://www.laziblues.com/names.html


Great names for Chocolate or Lilac kitties (and puppies):    

http://www.chocolatecats.com/cat-names.htm


Color words in other languages:

http://www.omniglot.com/language/colours/index.php


What people say:  

This is a really nice site, and I included my cattery in it.  Here are what a few folks have chosen to say (more references any time you ask!)...

http://www.pictures-of-cats.org/windrunner-cattery-munchkin-breeder.html#comments


If you decide you would like to put a $100 deposit down on a particular kitten, then a mailed check is fine, and it won't be cashed until the chosen kitten is 6 weeks old.  At that time it becomes non-refundable, but can be used for any available kitten or puppy at that time, or in the future.  

 If you feel more comfortable using PayPal, you can use my husband's email address to access PayPal:  mperrin12@gmail.com.  However, it is not any more "official" than a mailed check!  

With a deposit, you know I will hold your favorite one (or more!) for you, and no one will jump in front of your place "in line".  Please let me know if you decide to use PayPal.  Kittens sell surprisingly fast sometimes, and often more than one person is considering a particular kitten!  I would hate for two buyers to both put a deposit on the same kitten at the same time.  (I try to keep fistfights to a minimum, although one almost happened in my driveway once over a puppy!).  

Kitten Vaccines:  

Kittens receive antibodies from their mother through the placenta and after they are born, through the colostrum (the first milk). The age at which kittens can effectively be immunized is proportional to the amount of antibody protection the young animals received from their mother. Antibodies are small disease-fighting proteins produced by certain types of cells called ‘B cells.’ The proteins are made in response to ‘foreign’ particles such as bacteria or viruses. These antibodies bind with certain proteins (antigens) on foreign particles like bacteria, to help inactivate them. High levels of maternal antibodies present in a kitten’s bloodstream will block the effectiveness of a vaccine. When the maternal antibodies drop to a low enough level in the young animal, immunization by a commercial vaccine will work to help protect your kitten/cat against disease.  The vaccines are good for 2 to 3 yrs.  Your vet can check to see how high the level of antibodies are at 2 yrs since the last vaccines.  If they are still high, you can wait until 3 yrs. before getting more shots for your kitty.  New research shows that shots should not be given more often than every 2 yrs.  

And this from another excellent source:  
The typical vaccination protocol involves administering the vaccine to kittens starting at 6 – 8 weeks of age, and again at 10 – 12 weeks, and finally at 14 – 16 weeks of age. Cats then receive a booster one year later, and then every three years afterward, as it has been shown that the vaccine confers immunity for at least 3 years, and possibly longer in some cats. In lieu of revaccination, cat owners may elect to have their cats’ antibody level checked. Cats with protective levels of antibodies against herpes and calici do not need to be revaccinated, however, they should have their antibody level checked yearly, and be revaccinated if and when their antibody level is deemed too low to be protective.

Distemper combination vaccine (includes panleukopenia, rhinotracheitis and calicivirus. Include Chlamydophilia for cats at risk of exposure):  Begin as early as 6 weeks of age and repeat every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age.  Booster at 1 year after completion of initial series, then no more frequently than every 2 to 3 years.

Feline leukemia:  Begin as early as 8 weeks of age and repeat in 3-4 weeks.  Booster at 1 year after completion of initial series.  Continue annual boosters for those cats at risk of exposure. This vaccine is optional, but a good thing to have, especially if your kitty comes in contact with any outside cats or if you show or board your kitty.

Rabies:  Given by your local veterinarian (age at vaccination may vary according to local law and type of vaccine).  Re-vaccinate one year later, and then as required.  (If you cat never goes outside, nor do any other cats in your household, then the Rabies vaccination is optional--in my opinion).  

FIP:  This vaccine is NOT worth the risk.  It is 40 to 60% effective, and CAN cause your kitty to get FIP and die.  Also after receiving the vaccine, your cat will always test positive on any test for FIP.  I HIGHLY recommend NOT giving this vaccine to any cat or kitten.   

(Just a note from my experience...Calicivirus, Feline Herpes, Bordetella and Chlamydia are all on the rise.  These respiratory diseases are VERY difficult to get rid of.   Azithromycin (Zithromax®) has been the best defense we have had so far, but it is expensive.  There is good info on line if you need to research it.  This is the best site I have found:  http://fanciers.com/cat-facts/cat-health/12-Drugs%20and%20therapies/58-azithromycin-use-and-dosages-by-lorraine-shelton.html ).  

A FEW WORDS ABOUT “HEMORRHAGIC CALICIVIRUS”

A particularly virulent strain of calicivirus, commonly referred to as “hemorrhagic calici,” has appeared to “pop up” out of nowhere. While few outbreaks have been reported, it is possible more have occurred and gone unrecognized. Hemorrhagic calici is highly contagious and rapidly fatal. A special vaccine, called “Calicivax,” has become available from Fort Dodge Animal Health just for this special form of calici. While the infection is very rare, you may wish to vaccinate your cat for it and/or may wish to discuss this option completely with your veterinarian.

Here is a good site explaining upper respiratory infections in cats and kittens:  
http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_feline_upper_respiratory.html


Do NOT use Clumping Litter with Kittens!!!

Here is a compilation of several excellent sites on line to "boil the issue down" for you.  

Clumping litter is often lethal.  It contains sodium bentonite which absorbs moisture, swells, and hardens.  That is why this litter comes with advice not to flush it.  It will ruin plumbing.  Kittens with their tiny intestines are particularly vulnerable to its effects but all cats will suffer, ingesting the chemical when they stir up the litter and then clean their coats and paws.  

Cats inhale dust from clay litter, or ingest it while cleaning their feet. Kittens, being curious creatures, sometimes eat litter.  
      * The powerful clumping abilities of sodium betonite cause the ingested clay dust and particles which, when combined with natural and ingested liquid form a solid mass. (When liquid is added, bentonite swells to approximately 15 times its original volume, as quoted from Cat Fancy magazine in the McInnis article.)
      * Inhaled particles could cause similar problems in the moist climate of the lungs. (The dust in clay is silica dust, which is not particularly friendly to either human or feline lungs.)  
      * The "clumping activity" in the intestines could draw fluid out of the body, causing dehydration, and possibly consequential urinary tract problems.
      *  The clumping substance coats the digestive tract,"attracting the collection of old fecal material, increasing toxicity, bacteria growth and prohibiting proper assimilation of digested food. This can lead to stress on the immune system, leaving the animal susceptible to viral, bacterial, parasitic and yeast infections." (From an article by Lisa Newman.)
      * The problems can also extend to dogs, who sometimes are inexplicably drawn to "litter box snacks, or kitty crunchies!"
      * Gel litters are also unsafe for kittens!  
       
Alternative, safer Cat Litters:  
Natural alternatives to clumping clay kitty litters, such as plant-based litters, are available at many pet, health food, and especially feed stores. Plant-based litters are usually made from some combination of wheat, alfalfa, oat hulls, corn cob, wheat grass, peanut hulls, or recycled newspaper.  (I have tried the wheat, and corn cob litters.  I find them to stick to the kittens and cats, and travel all over outside of the litter box.  They make a big mess with bits of litter everywhere, and in their fur.  I like recycled newspaper litter and the wheat-grass pellet litter the best as an alternative to clay litter and scoop litter--so far).  

Corn
What it is and how it works: There are corn litters made from cobs and there are corn litters made from whole kernels. Cob litters tend to work better for caged pets, including birds. Kernel litters, because of their naturally porous structure, absorb ammonia and clump, making them the stuff of a good cat litter. While you might find a cob litter marketed for cats, Rainbolt warns that these "clump very soft and fall apart," so stick with kernels.

Pros: Digestible in cats' bellies if accidentally ingested while cleaning themselves, plus it's flushable -- though you should check with your water municipality to find out if it's safe to flush cat poops (California sea otters were recently deemed threatened by increased floaters). Its clumps "form so hard and quickly that you can even use it in a self-cleaning box," says Kutcher, who also claims it lasts long: "A seven-pound bag lasts me more than a month."

Cons: It's pricier than other litter varieties, plus Rainbolt says, "They tend to come with a lot of scent," which one cat owner seconded by saying, "The litter itself smelled weird." Also, the clumps are so hard that "you can't just throw it in your toilet and flush it," says Kutcher, "or you will do a number on your pipes like nobody's business. You have to let it sit in the bowl for a few minutes."  Some brands are lightweight and get caught in the kitty's fur, and it blows/drags out of the litter box easily.  Also occasionally kitties can inhale it and have a heck of a time sneezing/snorting it out of their airways.  

Recommended brands: The world's only whole-kernel litter is World's Best Cat Litter, and the name says it all; all three experts gave it raves. Rainbolt and Kutcher use it at home.

Pine
What it is and how it works: Pine sawdust is pressed into little pellets. When the cat goes wee-wee, the pellets expand and absorb.

Pros: One devout cat owner raves, "No chemicals, no odors, no dust, and it's biodegradable."

Cons: Can be pricey and sometimes hard to find. It doesn't clump, so you'll have to change the box regularly rather than scooping out waste. Kutcher warns, "I find it can stick to coats," while Rainbolt says, "The pellet texture can be an issue for cats with sensitive paws."  The smaller the pellets, the easier it is for cats to use.  

Recommended brands: Feline Pine takes the prize from pet experts and owners alike. Says Kutcher, "It's been around a long time and it's a very trusted brand. They made it for the right reason: to keep cats healthy." Borchelt also notes that Nature's Miracle "seems to clump very well and is a nice, alternative litter."  You can also use the pellets for a pellet stove, which are way more affordable, but sometimes they are a little tiny bit bigger pellets, so cats tend to leave their poops lying on the surface, which takes a while for the smell to leave!  They also might step in it then, or later.  The urine does go down into the pellets by itself, making the pellets poof into sawdust and takes care of the covering problem automatically!  It's GREAT for urine!  

Wheat
What it is and how it works:  Wheat litter's closest cousin is corn litter, as both are grain-derived, so it works the same as the corn kernel litters.

Pros: Non-toxic, naturally clumping, biodegradable -- it's all the things that those concerned about environment and health look for in a litter.

Cons: Big-time sticking to the litter box. Explains Rainbolt, "If you ever made flour glue as a kid, you know what I mean. I've had to throw away litter boxes when I can't get the wheat litter off." Borchelt also says that he gave wheat litter a try a few years ago, as did some of his clients, and it attracted bugs. "They were like little flies. They were horrible, and it took us a while to figure out they were coming from the litter."  Most brands are lightweight and get caught in the kitty's fur, and it blows/drags out of the litter box easily.  Also occasionally kitties can inhale it and have a heck of a time sneezing/snorting it out of their airways.  I didn't like it at all, it made a really big mess!  

Recommended brands: Kutcher likes Swheat Scoop, while Rainbolt says the key here isn't the name, but what it contains: Look for cornstarch as an ingredient, as those kinds don't stick to the pan as much.

Soy
What it is and how it works: The latest in litter wizardry, soy litter was unveiled in 2007 by The Organic Farm Store, a family-run business based in Washington state that produces organic fertilizers. Company founder Scott DeWaide said that he stumbled upon the idea after discovering that soybean meal had good water retention when used in his soil amendments. Soy's enzymes also make it naturally odor-absorbent, and when potato starch was added, the clumping began!

Pros: Not only is it all-natural, biodegradable and flushable -- it's made with meal-grade soybean, which means you can even eat it! As for cats, "It will pass right through their system," says DeWaide.

Cons: Only available at The Organic Farm Store's website and a select few independent pet boutiques. Hasn't been around long enough to develop a consensus as to its effectiveness, but Kutcher suggests there might be some unhealthy side effects. "Soy can affect female estrogen levels; in a very extreme case, you could wind up with some very bad issues with female cats."

Recommended brands: Right now, The Organic Farm Store's brand, called Close to Nature Now, is the only soy litter on the market.

Aspen
What it is and how it works: Also derived from trees, aspen litter works the same as pine.

Pros: The scent of pine can be a natural repellent for cats, so if you like using pine litter but your cat doesn't seem to go for the scent, aspen should satisfy both of you. "I find it to be a better ammonia absorber than pine, and it controls odor much better," says Rainbolt. "When I did side-by-side tests of aspen vs. pine, the aspen won every time."

Cons: Very hard to find and not many brands to choose from.

Recommended brands: Rainbolt likes Gentle Touch's aspen litter. (They also make a pine kind.)  

Tea Leaves
What it is and how it works: A popular home remedy for smelly cat litter is to sprinkle dried leaves of green tea into the pan.  So, of course, some folks got the idea to make a whole litter out of the stuff. The antioxidants that make green tea so healthy to drink are also what make this litter not stink.

Pros: Flushable and biodegradable -- and thanks to those antioxidants, bacteria-killing!  Kutcher says it's "just clean and simple stuff.  The absorption is really nice and it doesn't stink.  More health-conscious people use it. " It's also relatively lightweight compared to many other types of litter.

Cons: Like many of the newer types of litter, it might be hard to find in stores, and pricier.  Kutcher suggests making sure the brand you want to buy is a clumping kind, as "some brands do clump and others don't."

Recommended brands:  Kutcher's heard good things about Green Tea Leaves Clumping Cat Litter.  


About Regular (old fashioned) Clay
Although regular clay litters do not pose the potential health hazards that clumping clay kitty litters do, they do have their own problems:

Mining clay is hard on the environment.
      * Clay litters contribute significantly to landfills. Unlike many of the litters on this page, they cannot be composted, nor do they biodegrade.
      * Most, if not all, clay litters contain silica, which is potentially harmful. From a Web page at The Andersons' Web site (manufacturers of FIELDFresh): "Crystalline Silica, once airborne, shows the ability of causing Silicosis. This can cause incurable lesions on the lungs and throat, rendering that tissue useless for transferring oxygen. Crystalline Silica is a naturally occurring element, also known as Quartz, and is found in some of the clay litters. ... According to government standards, silica is a known carcinogen and a Prop 65 material in California."
      

What I Recommend
I am often asked what I recommend for litter that is safe and effective.

If you want a non-clay, clumping, scoopable litter, there are really only a few choices that I know of:

As of 2010, Feline Pine (wood-based product) now has a scoopable/clumping version; I haven't tried it yet, but I have been satisfied with their regular products in the past.
      * SWheatScoop, which is made from wheat and is indeed a clumping and scoopable litter. The key difference between it and clumping clay litters is that the wheat clumps are said to fall apart when they get wet, therefore not posing the health hazard that an indissoluble clump would.
      * WonderWheat, which I have never tried but sounds as though it is the Australian equivalent of SWheatScoop.
      * The World's Best Cat Litter. I hesitate to recommend this litter, for reasons listed under the product description, but it is still one of the best alternatives available and, I have heard, works in automatic cat boxes.
       
I have heard that there is a clay clumping litter that does not use sodium bentonite, but I have not had a chance to test it, and my concerns for kitty litters include as well as avoiding any kind of clay because of the silica present in all clays, as well as the impact on the environment, both in mining the clay and in the piling up of the litter in landfills. In addition, there are other kinds of bentonite that aren't quite as super-absorbent as sodium bentonite, but which would still cause concern if they were in a kitty litter.

If you want an excellent product that is acceptable to cats, easy on the environment, and easy on you, and you are willing to accept that they do not clump, the following litters are all quite satisfactory:

Chick starter (chicken feed for baby chickens). You can get this at your local feed store for a very economical price. It is very similar to The World's Best Cat Litter at a fraction of the cost.
      * CareFresh
      * FIELDFresh
      * Yesterday's News
       
A Warning Against Flushing Litter~
Although some of my comments below mention flushing some of the plant-based cat litters, that is not a recommended practice, especially on the West Coast. The biggest concern is that toxoplasmosis is killing sea otters, and it is possible that cat litter could be one of the sources. Most of the alternative cat litters can be composted, if you have a proper compost pile, or buried.

Newspaper-Based Litters
Recycled newspaper as a kitty litter comes in two basic forms: fluffy and pellets. Generally, all of them are biodegradable, more or less dust-free, flushable, and incinerable. The fluffy loose kind is, in my opinion, the best. They are easier on the paws and underfoot (when you accidentally step on the pellets, it hurts). The pellets are fine too, though. Both forms tend to get kicked out of the box, even with one of those boxes that have a slight overhang, though of course if you have an enclosed box this isn't a concern.

Advantages and disadvantages of recycled newspaper kitty litters:  

Because these products are made from recycled newspaper and are flushable, compostable, and incinerable (rather than having to go to a landfill), they are environmentally friendly.
      * The cost is quite reasonable and they last a long time.
      * They are messy, but easy to sweep up.
      * Some readers have expressed concern over the use of newsprint in recycled newsprint litters because of a concern for toxic inks used in printing. A little research shows that toxic inks have not been legal to use for many years, and many (if not all) of the litter manufacturers de-ink the newsprint as part of the manufacturing process.
       
Newspaper-based litters include

Breeder's Choice (an Australian company)
      * EcoFresh
      * Good Mews
      * Hi-Tor
      * PaPurr
      * Yesterday's News
       
Wood-Based Litters
Cedar- and wood-based litters have some amount of cedar in them; the chief advantage being natural odor control. These litters tend to be in pellet or wood-flake form.

Advantages and disadvantages of cedar- and wood-based litters

I have some concerns about the safety of using anything with cedar oils in it. I have heard that cedar oils can be harmful to cats. Also, be aware that cedar oils will antidote homeopathic remedies.
      * The wood flakes seem a little harsh for cats' paws. The pellet forms tend to fall apart into a dusty mass when the cat uses the litter; some may find this an advantage, others may find this a disadvantage.
      * Most wood-based litters are not very good at deodorizing, though Feline Pine is an exception.
      * I have friends who use pellet stove pellets for litter (roughly $7 to $8 for 40 lbs.).  Some cats are fine with it, others don't like it.  I find the cats don't want to cover the solid waste much, but the urine is absorbed quite well.   The kittens don't seem to want to eat it past one lick or two.  

FYI: A link sent in by a reader regarding toxic woods: http://www.mimf.com/archives/toxic.htm, and another page describing the definite problems with some woods, and some alternatives you can use: http://www.petfoodexpress.com/search/article_detailpe.asp?contentid=1163.

Also, bales of softwood shavings can make a good, inexpensive alternative to pine-based litters. For more information, see Leslie's Story.

INDEX:  

Wood-based litters include~
      * CareFresh
      * Cedar Lite
      * Feline Pine
      * Kind to Kitty
      * Luv My Kitty
      * Pine Pellet Bedding and Litter
      * Pinnacle Pine Cat Litter
      
Clumping Clay (no sodium bentonite)
However, there are other kinds of bentonite that could be used. I would avoid them all.

Cat's Pride
      * Glamour Kitty's Scooples (no longer being manufactured?)
      * Here's The Scoop! (no longer being manufactured?)
      
Other Plant-Based Litters
Plant-based litters are usually made from some combination of alfalfa, oat hulls, corn cob, peanut hulls, or other plants. Technically, wood-based and newspaper-based litters would fall into this caterogory as well, but I have separated them out.

Cat Country (unspecified)
      * CatWorks
      * Dr. Kenaf's Amazing Cat Litter (kenaf)
      * FIELDFresh (corn cobs)
      * KittyKoir (coconut coir, diatomaceous earth, mint, lavender, and barley sprouts)
      * SWheat Scoop and Wheat 'n Easy. Two wheat-based clumping litters from the same company.
      * WonderWheat. A wheat-based clumping litter made in Australia.
      * The World's Best Cat Litter. A corn-based clumping litter.
       
Other Materials
Alfalfa (avoid?)
      * Cat's Pride (unknown composition; haven't seen it yet)
      * CatWorks (avoid)
      * Chick starter (feed for baby chickens)
      * Citrus
      * Corn cob (avoid)
      * Here's the Scoop! (formerly Lick Your Chops) (Clumping clay, non-sodium bentonite? There are other bentonites, but I would avoid any cat litter using any kind of bentonite.)
      * Litter Pearls (silica; beware!)
      * Newspapers
      * Peanut hulls
      * Smart Litter Organic 'n' Safe (unknown composition; haven't seen it yet)
      * Bales of softwood shavings might make a good, inexpensive alternative to pine-based litters.
 

Here are some web sites that may be useful to some folks:  


Don't use clumping/scoop litters with kittens or around dogs: 

http://thelighthouseonline.com/articles/clump.html


AWESOME information for dog and cat owners in general, and for senior pets. 
It answers many
questions: 

http://www.srdogs.com/Pages/care.fr.html


Nail trimming: 

http://www.healthypet.com/PetCare/PetsMatter/ReadMore.aspx?new_key=8c67d191-bc87-4f60-871d-3770848a05d2&nar_key=f48ab952-f738-4fa2-88ca-af5f74ba4f7c&type=VSNP


Munchkin breeding questions and concerns: 

http://www.munchkins.com/page13_Munchkin_breeding_info.html


Lordosis in cats: 

http://www.munchkins.com/page12_Lordosis_xrays.html 


Munchkin Colors and History: 

http://www.themunchkinrugrunners.com/Colors.html
http://www.themunchkinrugrunners.com/Munchkin-History.html
http://www.tonkinesebreedassociation.org/TonkineseColors.html  

Cats 101:  Munchkin, a TV special on the educational channel has been watched a BUNCH:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rDCHxLh6IM


General Cat Information and Answers: 

http://www.catchannel.com/


Cat and Dog "Panties" and "Belly Bands" to prevent going potty, or marking, in the wrong place: 

http://www.designerdoggie.net/

http://www.poochieheaven.com/dogpanties.html

http://www.designerdoggie.net/special.html

http://www.puppybuns.org/

http://www.rockstar-puppy.com/potty---cleanup.html

http://stores.ebay.com/Castle-Paws-Designs?_trksid=p4340.l2563

http://www.mythicbells.com/stud_pants.htm#Photos


Genetic and health testing for cats and kittens: 

http://www.vgl.ucdavis.edu/services/cat/


Removing a tick from an animal: 

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/pic/article.cfm?c=3307&articleid=62&d=155

Treatment of Giardia in puppies/kittens/dogs/cats: 

http://bullmarketfrogs.com/blog/2009/01/treating-giardia-in-dogs/

Lower cost de-claw (preferred method is laser de-clawing when cat is over 14 wks. old): 

http://site.lowcostpetsurgery.com/

Comparison of different flea/tick treatments: 
http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2111&aid=598

Breeder's treatment of routine puppy/kitten problems: 
http://www.pofahlkennels.com/meds.htm

If your new baby has diarrhea, constipation, or a sore bottom:  

Stress, constipation, diarrhea, diet change, water change, change in activity level, hairballs, parasites, and/or the change of the PH balance in the intestines (usually due to stress) can cause an upset digestive tract.  If it is parasites, then you need pills, powder, or a liquid over several weeks to kill all of the parasites.  Call me, and if I have it, I'll send/give you what you need at my cost only-or free.  If your baby has a sore bottom, you can use a very small amount of Preparation H, or any hemorrhoid treatment (like Tucks)...you can use a little bit of it on the outside of the rectum.  After that you have to interact with or be with the baby to make sure he does not lick it off (it may be harmful to the kitty if he licks it off and swallows it).  After the salve (or Tucks) has been on his rectum for about 15 to 20 min., you can start applying warm compresses this way:  
Apply a warm compress to the rectal area.  If you have antibacterial soap in the house (Hibitane or chlorhexidene soap would be ideal) you can add a little to a cup of warm water.  Put a washcloth in, then wring it out.  Hold the warm, damp wash cloth to the swollen area for 10 minutes, rewarming it every 2 minutes or so.  Wipe the area with a plain wet washcloth and pat dry.  Do this 4 times a day, then as needed after that.    

Another thing you can do is this:  
Cut a human infant glycerin suppository lengthwise.  A small kitten should get no more than 1/8 of one suppository.  Insert into the rectum and massage the kitten’s belly, back, and bottom.  The suppository will slowly melt, and you may see a tiny bit of clear liquid come out of the rectum.  After about 15 minutes, (try to keep the kitten from licking his bottom, but glycerine is not really harmful), start applying warm compresses as described above.  Do this about 4 times the first day, then as needed after that.  

The last (but very effective) thing to do that will help is:  
Surprisingly, a simple can of pumpkin puree is a safe and natural home remedy for treating both constipation and diarrhea in cats and dogs (and people!).  Constipation is a common problem which often happens in dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens.  Some pets just need more fiber in their diet, especially if they eat dry cat or dog food.  Pumpkin is a wonderful source of fiber and has high water content.  If your pet is constipated, the fiber in the pumpkin will soften the stools.  If your pet is experiencing diarrhea, the fiber in the pumpkin will absorb the water in your pet's digestive system which will help make the stools firmer.
The weight of your pet will determine how much pumpkin to give them.  A pet which weighs less than five pounds should be given 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of pumpkin puree a day.  A pet which weighs 6 to 15 pounds should be given 1-2 teaspoons of pumpkin puree a day.  A 15-35 pound pet should receive 1-2 tablespoons daily, and a pet 35 pounds and up (or a person) can be given 2-5 tablespoons of pumpkin puree daily.  If you find your pet's stool becomes too runny, cut back on the amount of pumpkin.  The pumpkin can be given once a day, or half in the morning and half in the evening.  
Some cats seem to have a brand preference when it comes to canned pumpkin. If they don't seem to care for Libby's Pumpkin Puree, try Festal canned pumpkin, or one of several other brands.  Some cats will only eat the pumpkin if you add a little warm water.  Some love it straight out of the can, and some don't.  Do NOT mistakenly purchase pumpkin pie filling which has spices and extra sugar added.
**To keep the can of pumpkin puree from going bad, freeze individual teaspoon or tablespoon portions in an ice cube tray. Once they are frozen, you can dump the cubes of pumpkin in a freezer bag and take them out as needed.

Good riddance to Fleas, Ticks, Ear Mites, Mange, Heartworm, and Roundworm:  

The flea protection I use is Revolution (in the UK the same thing is called Stronghold).  Advantage and Frontline are also good, but I like Revolution (or Stronghold) because, not only does it kill fleas and ticks, it also kills ear mites, skin mites, and HEARTWORM!  It also does a pretty good number on roundworm (kills most in dogs, and all in cats).  I order it from PetShed.com in Australia or PetBucket in the UK, since you don't need a vet's prescription.  Also, if you get 6 mos. at a time, PetShed sends you free dog wormer tablets that work great to get rid of ALL worms, including tapeworm. 

http://www.petshed.com/products/item109.asp  

ALSO...another excellent site with free shipping for medicine, flea treatments, shampoos, and other wonderful things that you often need a prescription for, but not with these guys, is: 

http://fleastuff.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PLST&Store_Code=F

And finally, the other site that I have used is this one.  I am very dissatisfied with them now!  ...

http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Categories/Flea/%22Revolution%20Dogs%22  

This site may be the cheapest if you use a coupon from a coupon site on line, but it can take anywhere from 14 to 60 days to receive your order!!!  Be prepared to wait a VERY LONG time to get your products!  And PetBucket is cheaper and way faster anyway!!!  

Just note that often sites with free shipping do charge tax, and sites that charge shipping, often don't charge tax.  

Shipping can be less than the tax!  

Note to folks ordering "Revolution" ~ "Stronghold" (selamectin) by Pfizer is the UK version of "Revolution".  It has the same formulation and ingredients as "Revolution", but is MUCH less expensive!  Here is the link to a site called PetBucket that sells Stronghold (and Revolution) with no prescription.  This is the dog Stronghold (that I also use on my cats):  

http://www.petbucket.com/Listing/Filter/?categoryId=4521471&brandId=2271265&sortItem=0&sortDirection=0&page=11

Here is the method I have formulated for using Revolution (or Stronghold) on my dogs and cats-I'm not a vet, but just someone who likes to save money whenever possible!  Use this formula at your own risk!  I have used it successfully for many years...

The Revolution can be ordered (on line) without a prescription from Petshed.com or PetBucket.com or fleastuff.com, who are all animal medical suppliers in Australia (or the UK).  It takes from 7 to 14 days to arrive (unless you use vidals.com who may take up to 2 months!).  It is less expensive from those sites, and PetShed.com includes 8 tablets of free Canex (each tablet treats 20 lbs. of dog weight), an xlnt complete wormer tablet-(I cut the pills into quarters-each treats a 5 lb. puppy). You can order the size tubes to treat a 45 to 85 lb. dog (the largest offered on petshed.com, PetBucket.com or on vidalspets.com), or on fleastuff.com you can order the largest size made:  80 to 135 lb. dog size, and then divide it.  

FOR DOGS:  

You figure 4 drops of Revolution per pound of DOG.  In other words...a 6 lb. dog would get 24 drops, and an 8 lb. dog would get 32 drops, etc.  When (and if) the dog starts itching again before a month has passed, add 2 to 3 extra drops at that point, and give it a couple of days before adding 2 more drops, until you find the right amount to protect your dog for an entire month.  It will be close to 4 drops per lb. (with maybe a few extra drops if your dog has a very thick or long coat, or if it is a bad "flea infested" or hot time of year).  I use a couple of extra drops per month in the warmer months, then back off a drop or two in the colder months.  It's better to err on the side of caution and increase slowly until the treatment lasts a complete month.  After you open the tube, you need to keep it upright to protect the unused part from evaporating.  I keep mine, closed tightly, taped to the inside of the cupboard door in the kitchen.  That way I know where it is for the next month, and no kids, pets, etc. will get it or knock it over during the month!  If you lay it down, it will evaporate within 2 days, even though it is closed tightly!  I'm not a vet or a sales rep for their companies, just a regular person who likes to save money.  AND not being a vet, I can tell you that I also use the dog Revolution (or Stronghold) on my cats.  

FOR CATS:  

Instead of 4 drops per pound, I use 3 drops per pound of CAT weight. It's the same chemical for a dog and a cat, just a lower strength for the cat!  So a 2 lb. kitten would get 6 drops of dog Revolution, and a 5 lb. kitty gets 10 or 11 drops (add one to two extra drops if the cat has extra long or thick hair), and so on.  A ten lb. cat would get about 30 to 32 drops, 33 or 34 drops if it is a longhair cat.  As with a dog, if the dose does not protect for one month, you can add a drop or 2 to your formula next time you use it, and by trial and error, see how much it will take to protect your particular cat, with his/her particular coat, in the warmer or colder months, but it will be close to 3 drops per pound of cat weight, plus one or two or three drops, depending on the cat's coat, weight, and the season.  (No guarantees, no lawsuits, please...but it works for me and my animals just great!  I have never had a problem, and it saves me a lot of money).  Figure a tube of 80 to 135 lb. dog size Revolution (or Stronghold).  Use the lower weight of 80 lbs.  At 3 drops a lb., that will do roughly 10 10-lb. cats, or about 25 to 30 3-lb. kittens!  If you have puppies, it will do about 7 to 8 10-lb. dogs, and about 20 4-lb. puppies.  Not to mention it will do 4 20-lb. dogs, or 2 40-lb. dogs.  You can spend a LOT of bucks to have your small pets protected by buying a single tube for each one, or you can just buy the giant size tube and divide it.  Other than the protection from fleas and ticks for cats and dogs, the other blessings are the protection from ear mites, heartworm, skin mites and roundworm!  

From the manufacturer:  

Revolution is recommended for use in dogs six weeks of age or older and cats eight weeks of age and older for the following parasites and indications: 

Dogs:  

Revolution kills adult fleas and prevents flea eggs from hatching for one month and is indicated for the prevention and control of flea infestations (Ctenocephalides felis) prevention of heartworm disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis and the treatment and control of ear mite (Otodectes cynotis) infestations. Revolution also is indicated for the treatment and control of sarcoptic mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) and for the control of tick infestations due to (Dermacentor variabilis).  

Cats:  

Revolution kills adult fleas and prevents flea eggs from hatching for one month and is indicated for the prevention and control of flea infestations (Ctenocephalides felis) prevention of heartworm disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis and the treatment and control of ear mite (Otodectes cynotis) infestations. Revolution is also indicated for the treatment and control of roundworm (Toxocara cati) and intestinal hookworm (Ancylostoma tubaeforme) infections in cats.  


        
        GOOD AS GOLD
        Here are a five golden rules to follow when attempting to reshape your pet’s behavior:
        
        Start behavior training early. The best time to teach is when your pets are puppies or kittens, when they are most receptive. But do not think you cannot teach an old dog (or cat) a new trick, because you can.
              * Make the training session fun. Never try to teach your pet when you are feeling harried or stressed. Animals can tap into our stress levels and sense impatience. Be encouraging, upbeat, and patient.
              * Keep the lessons short. Typically, animals do not have a long attention span. Spend no more than 5 minutes at a time when training a cat and 10 minutes, on average, with a dog.
              * Identify what motivates your pet. Pets are much more willing to learn a new behavior when they anticipate a reward as the payoff. For cats, it can be a feathered toy you dangle in front of their eyes for them to chase or offering a pinch of catnip. For dogs, it can be tiny pieces of premium treats you dole out each time they comply with your commands.
              * Communicate clearly and com­pletely. Pets not only heed your vocal tones, but they pay a lot of attention to your gestures and postures. So, if you want your dog to sit, for example, be sure to use the same hand signal each time and do not make it similar to your signal for your dog to roll over or to stay.
              *
        Hopefully, these general guidelines will get you and your pet on the right foot toward good behavior. Following are a few species-specific considerations to keep in mind.
        
        COUNTERING YOUR CAT’S BAD HABITS
        You can learn to “outfox” your feline, says Dr. Arnold Plotnick, owner of the Manhattan Cat Specialists Clinic in New York City and medical editor for Catnip magazine. First, identify the misbehavior, stop it, and then redirect your cat to an. There are somethings you might not even thinks of that can poison your dog, such as Tylenol, onions, pot pourri etc..
        Even applying typical flea and tick preventions can be hazardous unless you use the appropriate products how they are supposed to be used.  
        (Don't use Hartz Flea & Tick drops that you get at the department stores like Wal-Mart and K-Mart.  It can cause loss of hair, seizures, and death)!  

        
Fading Kitten and Puppy Syndrome
(Failure to Thrive)        

 

So, what causes this?   Actually many things, but one thing we can all control at home is...the cleaning products we use.  Yes, bleach is great, and so is Formula 409, and Comet, and those cleaning wipes, and soap and water, too, but don't just clean and leave the dried film on the floors, furniture, counters, shelves, tables, sinks, toys, dishes, etc.  The kitty or doggie will walk over these surfaces, then lick their feet, and ingest small amounts of left-over cleaning product.  The answer is to wipe down cleaned surfaces with paper towels, clean sponges, or mops wet with plain water!  Yes, please clean off these already-disinfected surfaces with a water wipe-down, to provide a non-toxic surface for our pets to safely walk/play/sleep on.  That includes the toys and bowls!  Then you can sleep well  (-:  


                Top 10 Pet Poisons of 2009
                 
                With various dangers lurking in corners and cabinets, the home can be a minefield of poisons for our pets. In 2009, the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) in Urbana, IL, handled more than 140,000 cases of pets exposed to toxic substances, many of which included everyday household products. Don’t leave it up to Fido or Fluffy to keep themselves safe. Below is a list of the top 10 pet poisons that affected our furry friends in 2009.
        
Human Medications
        For several years, human medications have been number one on the ASPCA’s list of common hazards, and 2009 was no exception. Last year, the ASPCA managed 45,816 calls involving prescription and over-the-counter drugs such as painkillers, cold medications, antidepressants and dietary supplements. Pets often snatch pill vials from counters and nightstands or gobble up medications accidentally dropped on the floor, so it’s essential to keep meds tucked away in hard-to-reach cabinets.
        
Insecticides
        In our effort to battle home invasions by unwelcome pests, we often unwittingly put our furry friends at risk. In 2009, our toxicologists fielded 29,020 calls related to insecticides. One of the most common incidents involved the misuse of flea and tick products—such as applying the wrong topical treatment to the wrong species. Thus, it’s always important to talk to your pet’s veterinarian before beginning any flea and tick control program.
        
People Food
        People food like grapes, raisins, avocado and products containing xylitol, like gum, can seriously disable our furry friends, and accounted for more than 17,453 cases in 2009. One of the worst offenders—chocolate—contains large amounts of methylxanthines, which, if ingested in significant amounts, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst, urination, hyperactivity, and in severe cases, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors and seizures.
        
Plants
        Common houseplants were the subject of 7,858 calls to APCC in 2009. Varieties such as azalea, rhododendron, sago palm, lilies, kalanchoe and schefflera are often found in homes and can be harmful to pets. Lilies are especially toxic to cats, and can cause life-threatening kidney failure even in small amounts.
 

Veterinary Medications   
        Even though veterinary medications are intended for pets, they’re often misapplied or improperly dispensed by well-meaning pet parents.  In 2009, the ASPCA managed 7,680 cases involving animal-related preparations such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heartworm preventatives, de-wormers, antibiotics, vaccines and nutritional supplements.
        
Rodenticides 
        Last year, the ASPCA received 6,639 calls about pets who had accidentally ingested rat and mouse poisons. Many baits used to attract rodents contain inactive ingredients that are attractive to pets as well. Depending on the type of rodenticide, ingestions can lead to potentially life-threatening problems for pets including bleeding, seizures or kidney damage.  

        
Household Cleaners
        Everybody knows that household cleaning supplies can be toxic to adults and children, but few take precautions to protect their pets from common agents such as bleaches, detergents and disinfectants. Last year, the ASPCA received 4,143 calls related to household cleaners. These products, when inhaled by our furry friends, can cause serious gastrointestinal distress and irritation to the respiratory tract.  Please don't let cats/kittens walk in the wet surface left by the disposable cleaning cloths!!!  
        
Heavy Metals
        It’s not too much loud music that constitutes our next pet poison offender.  Instead, it’s heavy metals such as lead, zinc and mercury, which accounted for 3,304 cases of pet poisonings in 2009.  Lead is especially pernicious, and pets are exposed to it through many sources, including consumer products, paint chips, linoleum, and lead dust produced when surfaces in older homes are scraped or sanded.
        
Garden Products
        It may keep your grass green, but certain types of fertilizer and garden products can cause problems for outdoor cats and dogs. Last year, the ASPCA fielded 2,329 calls related to fertilizer exposure, which can cause severe gastric upset and possibly gastrointestinal obstruction.
        
Chemical Hazards
        In 2009, the ASPCA handled approximately 2,175 cases of pet exposure to chemical hazards. A category on the rise, chemical hazards—found in ethylene glycol antifreeze, paint thinner, drain cleaners and pool/spa chemicals—form a substantial danger to pets. Substances in this group can cause gastrointestinal upset, depression, respiratory difficulties and chemical burns.
        
        Prevention is really key to avoiding accidental exposure, but if you suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please contact your veterinarian or the Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435.

"Dogs eat. Cats dine."              Ann Taylor

Feeding your kitten:  

        I feed my kittens "Taste of the Wild" brand cat food.  It is an excellent food for a good price.  You can get Taste of the Wild at many local pet store, feed store (where you get food for horses), and you can also order it on line for about the same price.  It varies from $28 to $33 for 20 lbs. for the green bag or the brown bag).  If you want to change brands, then you can mix the food I give you with another brand half and half, then when the mixture is gone, just switch to the new brand.  Here are some good brands, just in a random order:  

Blue (Blue Buffalo) Cat Food 

Royal Canin Kitten Food 

Taste of the Wild  

Felidae 

Evo 

Chicken Soup for the Kitten Lover's Soul 

Wellness 

Drs Foster and Smith 

Iams Kitten

Science Diet Kitten


You can research this on line, but there are MANY opinions.  I don't recommend raw diets myself, nor do any of my breeder friends (except one!).  Too easy to catch something.  No matter what they say.  Also all 3 of my vets do not recommend raw diets...nor making your own food at home.  Just supplementing a regular purchased food with home-made food, if you want (though not necessary).  Wet food is nice, but should be limited to several tablespoons a day.  It has preservatives in it that can cause diarrhea.  (They eventually get used to it and that stops happening).  Always have fresh water available so the cat can flush out his/her kidneys.  (As a treat, I give tuna water left over from the can when I have it).  

        
        Here are the top 5 kitten foods in one notable survey, with Royal Canin, Taste of the Wild, Blue Buffalo and Felidae in the top 10:  
        
        Kittens have special nutritional needs to promote growth and development, such as extra protein for muscle development; fat for energy, fatty acids, and to carry fat-soluble vitamins; and extra vitamins and minerals for strong bones and teeth. These foods were ranked first, for protein source, and second, for nutritional analysis, giving weight to protein and fat, although other factors applied.
        
        
        These dry kitten foods do not contain any wheat gluten, nor were they part of the Menu Foods recall of March 16, 2007.
        
1. Innova EVO Cat and Kitten Dry Food
        EVO handily scored five stars in my review of this product. Although I usually prefer foods made specifically for kittens, the 42% protein (not converted to dry matter) sold me on EVO for growing kittens as well as for adult cats. The first listed ingredients are Turkey, Chicken, Turkey Meal, Chicken Meal, Potatoes, Herring Meal, Chicken Fat, EVO contains no grains at all.
        
2. Wellness Super5 Mix - Kitten Formula
        Wellness came in handily as second, with 34% protein and 20% fat. The first five ingredients were Deboned Chicken, Chicken Meal, Chicken Liver, Ground Brown Rice, and Ground Whole Oats. The fat source listed was Canola Oil, rather than chicken fat. Wellness consistently ranks high among Cats Forum members, and their kitten food is no exception. Buy Direct
        
3. Drs. Foster & Smith Dry Kitten Food - Chicken & Brown Rice Formula
        This kitten food listed Chicken, Chicken Meal, Brown Rice, Rice, and Chicken Fat as the first five ingredients. The guaranteed analysis showed a whopping 37% crude protein and 22% crude fat. In the Nutritional Analysis, Drs. Foster & Smith Dry Kitten Food exceeded minimum industry standards (AAFCO) in every category.
        
4. Premium Edge Kitten Chicken, Salmon and Vegetables Formula
        Premium Edge Kitten Formula was the food of choice at the foster home our kitten Billy came from, and we continued to use this brand until he was an adult. It's fairly inexpensive, and lists Chicken, Chicken Meal, White Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, and Chicken Fat as the first five ingredients. I'd have preferred not to see the "corn," but Billy did not demonstrate any food allergies. Protein: 34%, Fat: 22%
        
5. Chicken Soup for the Kitten Lover's Soul Kitten Formula
        Chicken Soup cat and kitten formulas are a standby among the About.com Cats Forum, and for good reasons: a respectable list of ingredients and cats generally love these foods. The kitten formula weighs in at 34% with crude fat at 22%. Top listed ingredients are Chicken, chicken meal, cracked pearled barley, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols), ocean fish meal, white rice, potatoes, oatmeal, millet. If I had kittens again, I'd not hesitate to feed this kitten food.
        
        
6.  Shop Royal Canin Pet Food Save 15% on Royal Canin Pet Food. And It's Delivered to Your Door!  PetFoodDirect.com
        
        
        
        Top picks for kitten canned food; I use Felidae Kitten canned food (now called Canidae):  
        
        Kittens need a premium canned food for the source of all the necessary nutrients needed to promote the development of strong bones and muscles, promote healthy teeth and gums, and to provide a source of protein and energy needed for the intense period of growth which occurs during the all-important first year. These foods were chosen with these qualities in mind. The nutritional value percentages have been converted to "dry matter" basis for uniformity.
        
Felidae (now Canidae) Cat and Kitten Formula with Chicken, Turkey, Lamb and Ocean Fish
        Normally, I would not include an "all life stages" food in a listing for kittens especially as the first choice. However, Felidae matches Evolve Kitten in the growth and energy nutrients, at 50% Protein and 32% fat, and is a palatable food most cats like, at a comparatively low price. Top Ingredients: Chicken, Turkey, Chicken Broth, Chicken Liver, Ocean Fish, Lamb, Brown Rice, Egg, Sun Cured Alfalfa Meal, Sunflower Oil, Lecithin, Nutritional Yeast, Rosemary, Cranberry Meal, Kelp.
        
Evolve Kitten Turkey Formula
        Evolve makes a fine line of mid-priced premium cat foods for both adult cats and kittens, and is a favorite among my test cats. It ranks at the top of kittens' requirements for protein and fat, with 50% and 32% (dry matter value). First listed ingredients are Turkey, Turkey Broth, Turkey Liver, Chicken, Ocean Fish, Brown Rice. If your kitten likes it, you can't go wrong with Evolve.
        
        Disclaimer: Triumph, the parent company of Evolve, has had some pet food products recalled. No Evolve products have been recalled, as of 5/14/07. (Information from The Pet Food List.)
        
Precise Feline Kitten Formula
        I have not personally tested this food, but it ranks high as an "all stages" food based on ingredients and guaranteed analysis. The first listed ingredients are chicken meal, Ground Brown Rice, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and Ascorbate Palmitate).
        
Avoderm Cat and Kitten Canned
        Avoderm (made by Breeders' Choice) was one of the first kitten foods we bought for Jaspurr and Joey and as adults their canned food diet includes Avoderm in rotation. It weighs in at a respectable 45% and 32% for protein and fat. Named ingredients are Chicken, Chicken Broth, Ocean Fish, Turkey, Kidney, Chicken Liver, Oat Bran, Rice Flour, and Avocado Oil.
        
        
        Some Tips for choosing a cat food:  
        
http://cats.about.com/cs/catfood/a/tipsforchoosing.htm
        
        
        
        Pro/Con info on Early Spay/Neuter
        
(Personally I feel females should be spayed at about 6 mos., and males should be neutered at about 5 mos. of age)...


Site with negative feelings and info on early spay/neutering of cats/dogs:  

http://www.2ndchance.info/spayneuter.htm


Article more in favor of early spay/neutering of cats/dogs:  

                                 

                Early Age Altering


                           Susan Little, DVM, DABVP (Feline)
                                            ©2006
Early age or prepuberal altering (EAA) refers to gonadectomy (spay or neuter) between six and sixteen weeks of age and is now more commonly practiced as veterinarians gain experience with pediatric anesthesia and surgery. The traditional gonadectomy age is about six months, although in some countries, gonadectomy may be delayed until one year of age.  Prepuberal gonadectomy is altering before the onset of puberty, which may occur in females between 4 and 21 months of age and in males between 8 and 10 months of age. Prepuberal gonadectomy has been commonly recommended by veterinarians for many years to avoid unwanted pregnancy and to reduce the risk of mammary cancer. What is new is the earlier age at which prepuberal altering is now being performed. EAA is one desirable approach for control of pet overpopulation as it enables shelters to perform pre-adoption altering and avoids the risk of owner non-compliance with altering contracts.  Increasingly, it is recognized there are also health benefits to EAA.  Major veterinary organizations around the world are supportive of EAA, including:
    • American Veterinary Medical Assoc.
    • Canadian Veterinary Medical Assoc.
    • British Small Animal Veterinary Assoc
    • European Society of Feline Medicine
    • Feline Advisory Bureau (U.K.)
    • Winn Feline Foundation
Health Issues
Objections to EAA have included concerns about:
    • Effect on growth
    • Long bone fracture risk
    • Obesity
    • Behavioral changes
    • Increased risk of disease
    • Safety of surgery and anesthesia in pediatric patients
Testosterone and estrogen assist maturation of the growth plates in long bones. Growth stops when physeal closure occurs. Intact cats have distal radial physeal closure at 1 year of age or older. Cats altered at 7 weeks and 7 months of age had distal radial physeal closure about 8 weeks later than intact cats. The effect of this delay in physeal closure is unknown, but adult size in cats is not significantly affected by age of altering. It has been suggested that delayed physeal closure may predispose cats to Salter fractures of the femoral capital growth plates. The femoral capital growth plate normally closes between 7.5 and 10 months of age. Other risk factors for this type of fracture include obesity and gender/reproductive status (neutered male). The risk of fracture would be the same for cats altered at any age that results in delayed physeal closure, not just EAA cats. These fractures appear to be rare in the altered cat population. One large study (Spain et al) failed to find any association between EAA and long bone fracture risk in cats.  Obesity is a multifactorial problem involving diet, exercise, age and other factors. Altered cats have a lower metabolic rate than sexually intact cats regardless of the age at gonadectomy. Altered male cats require 28% less calories than intact male cats and altered female cats require 33% fewer calories than intact female cats. Clients should be counseled on the dietary needs of altered cats to avoid obesity. Compared to altered cats, sexually intact cats show less affection to humans and more aggression to other cats. One study has shown that EAA male cats are less aggressive to vets, and exhibit fewer problems with urine spraying. Spain et al showed there is no difference in the prevalence of significant behaviour problems based on age at altering.  Lower urinary tract disease in cats is caused by a wide variety of factors such as diet, water intake and stressors. The diameter of the male urethra is no smaller in EAA cats than in intact cats. Age at altering does not influence risk of urinary tract disease; in fact, one study showed a lower risk of urinary tract obstruction in EAA male cats. Several long term studies have been performed to assess health risks of EAA. These studies confirm that EAA is not associated with any increased risk of disease, but rather is associated with a lower risk of some diseases (such as asthma and gingivitis).
Anesthesia and Surgery
Pediatric patients have unique perioperative, anesthetic and surgical issues. With the use of safe and effective techniques, it has been shown that EAA does not increase morbidity or mortality associated with anesthesia and surgery. In fact, kittens altered at less than 12 weeks had lower postoperative complication rates than those altered at over 23 weeks of age in one study. There are surgical benefits to EAA that include less bleeding, improved visualization of organs, shorter surgery times and more rapid recoveries.  Pediatric patients distribute and metabolize drugs differently, so the clinician must be careful with drug selection and doses. Bear in mind that renal and hepatic function does not reach adult levels until about 12-14 weeks of age. Certain anesthetic concerns must be addressed, such as the neonate’s rate dependent cardiac output, maintenance of breath rate, and minimizing dead space in anesthetic equipment. Certain anesthetic drugs should be avoided in pediatric patients, but many safe and effective drug protocols have been described. Hypothermia occurs easily due to the greater surface area:volume ratio of the neonate, less subcutaneous fat and reduced ability to shiver. Hypothermia can cause bradycardia and prolonged recovery from anesthesia. The prep, surgery and recovery areas should be kept warm. Ensure kittens are never placed on cold metal surfaces. Use warmed blankets or circulating water blankets to maintain body temperature. Plastic “bubble pack” wrapping is also useful for maintaining warmth. Warm the surgery prep solutions, and replace alcohol with sterile saline. Hypoglycemia occurs easily due to their small hepatic glycogen reserves, so neonates should not be fasted for more than 2 to 3 hours before anesthesia. Within an hour of recovery, they should be offered a small meal. Kittens unwilling to eat after an hour or more can be given oral dextrose to prevent hypoglycemia.  Certain surgical concerns must also be addressed. Meticulous hemostasis is necessary as tissues are more friable than in adults, so handle tissues gently. For males, perform closed castration via a single or double scrotal incision, tie off with absorbable suture or use hemostatic clips and leave the scrotal incision open. For females, the OHE technique is the same as for a mature cat. It is best to close the skin with subcuticular sutures or tissue adhesive and avoid skin sutures. Note that serous fluid in the abdomen of neonates is normal.


Five Rules for Successful Early Age Altering


1. Kittens should have a complete physical exam; have their first vaccination and treatment for parasites; postpone surgery if any illness or abnormality is found (including cryptorchidism)
2. Weigh each kitten to nearest 100 grams, calculate drug doses carefully
3. Combat hypoglycemia: withhold food for only 2-4 hours; feed a small meal within 1 hour of recovery; administer 50% dextrose orally to kittens with prolonged recoveries or those that will not eat post-op
4. Decrease stress: keep litters together before surgery in a warm, quiet environment; minimize handling; avoid IV injections; reunite litters as soon as possible after recovery
5. Combat hypothermia: insulate against cold surfaces, minimize hair coat clipping, avoid alcohol in preps, warm prep solutions, monitor rectal temperature, use supplemental heat sources (warm blankets, hot water bottles, heat lamps, etc.)

For more information:
The Cat Group (UK) Policy Statement:
http://www.fabcats.org/neut.html
Please Note: The Winn Feline Foundation provides the feline health information on this site as a service to
the public. Diagnosis and treatment of specific conditions should always be in consultation with one's own
veterinarian. The Winn Feline Foundation disclaims all warranties and liability related to the veterinary
information provided on this site.



San Diego Spay/Neuter info for low-cost sites:  

Here is the link to San Diego Pet Assistance.  They refer you to vets that give a discount in your area.  
This is for San Diego:
http://www.orgsites.com/ca/pet-assistance/
And this is for North County:
http://www.petassistancenorthcounty.org/
That includes SNAP....spay/neuter assistance program
and The Neuter Scooter
Also there is the Feral Cat Coalition who might be able to get it done for free, it is also run by donations:
http://www.feralcat.com/

Some clinics and vets I have heard good things about:   

SNAP- Spay Neuter Action Project has the "Neuter Scooter" who charges $40 to spay or neuter a
cat, and $45 to $50 for a dog.  (619) 525-3047  http://www.snap-sandiego.org/  (for lower income folks)

Pearson Animal Hospital in San Marcos, Ca. 92078                 (760)598-2512    http://pearsonvet.com/


The El Cajon vet is Agape Vet Hospital, Dr. Ganasi:  (these are his prices whether or not you go through Pet Assistance)
http://local.yahoo.com/info-20812266-ganasi-rolando-dvm-agape-veterinary-hospital-el-cajon
Cats:                                Dogs:
Fem  $50                          Fem    doesn't do them
Male  $40                         Male   $50

The Vet in Valley Center my friend Nancy used for low cost spay/neuter is Countryside.   Here is the link:
http://www.merchantcircle.com/business/Countryside.Veterinary.Clinic.760-749-3656

The cat or dog cannot be in heat or pregnant, or there is an additional $10 to $15 fee.  The males have to have both testicles descended, or there is an additional fee based on the complication of the surgery.  
Pain medications beyond what is required for the actual surgery are optional and additional (usually $15 extra).
Blood work before surgery is optional, (not required), and an additional fee.

SHIPPING YOUR PUPPY OR KITTEN from San Diego:   

Here are the numbers, as well as helpful info pages about shipping a pet.  As far as how to do this, the kitten or puppy is technically old enough to fly at 8 weeks, but it is stressful to fly, and they are pretty scared when you pick them up at the airport.  That's why it is best to get a non-stop flight, or at least a flight with no changes, just one stop.  If that isn't possible, then no more than one change.  Every change is scary to them, and gives you one more opportunity for them to get lost, stolen, forgotten, or hurt.  It also takes longer.  I take the kitten/puppy in her kennel to the airport and give her to the airline usually one and a half hour (sometimes two hours are required) before the flight.  She (or he) will have water (frozen in a cup that attaches to the door-so it won't spill in transit to the plane), and food with her.  I also put newspaper in the bottom, a little soft blanket in the back, and shredded paper in the front.  Some airlines will let me put a soft, fluffy stuffed animal in with her.  I get her mom's (or littermates') smell on it (and the blanket) before it goes into the kennel.  Also I put a couple of toys with her.  That will become her "security" kitty or puppy, in the place of mom.  Then you go to the airport (either cargo, baggage, or ticketing--I will let you know), and pick her up about 1/2 to 1 hr. after landing.  I always get there when the plane lands and just wait!  It's stressful for me, too, until they are with me and OK.  I have had a few puppies and kittens shipped to me.  You pay for the kennel, the health certificate, and the airfare.  The cheapest (and best!) kennel I get is at WalMart for about $30 for a small/medium size "100", and about $39 for the medium/large size "200".  Now they do not include the required food/water cups with the kennel, so they have to be purchased separately for $5.  Most vets around me charge $65 to $90 for a health certificate (that's the health exam and certificate).  I will drive extra to get the least expensive one for you, within reason!  The health certificate is good for 10 days.   The one reason we couldn't ship is if it was too cold or hot at any point of the flight (and a few Airlines have closed cargo offices on Sunday in San Diego).  The airlines tell you the expected temperatures at each place the plane lands, and tell you if the weather is OK to ship.  Continental has merged with United.  It is temperature controlled the whole way, so the outside temps don't matter when you use them. 

The kitten (or puppy) comes with a bath, clean ears, trimmed nails, a little blanket, a toy or two, the fluffy "mom substitute" stuffed animal to ship with her, her TICA, CFA (or AKC) papers (if purchased), and her shot record (she will be current on shots and wormings).  There is a one year health guarantee covering any congenital defects, or any serious diseases that he/she would have contracted at my house.  I also put "Revolution" (for fleas, ear mites, skin mites, heartworm and roundworm) on him/her, if you would like.  It is safe for puppies and kittens, and it is better than Advantage or Frontline in my opinion.  If you prefer I don't use it, then I won't.  My babies do not have fleas, but I use it when they are 8 weeks old as a deterrent.  Also, the kennel is yours to keep. 

 

American Airlines ~ 

Total flight cost:  $205.00  for a medium sized ("100") kennel. 

Add $30 for the "100" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

Grand total for shipping a puppy in a "100" kennel is $305.

Total flight cost:  $210.00  for a larger sized ("200") kennel. 

Add $39 for the "200" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

 Grand total for shipping a puppy in a "200" kennel is $319.

Continental/United ~  

9 lbs. and under for pet and small or medium size kennel:  Flight base cost is $189 ~ Add USA freight processing fee/fuel surcharge/CA sales tax = $34, approx $223, & with $6 insurance, it is $229 for total airfare.  (The insurance/declared value of $6 is optional, but recommended).  Add $30 for a medium size kennel "100" and the food/water cups are $5, and $65 for health certificate.  

Grand total for shipping 9 lbs and under is $324. 

Add $39 for the "200" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

Grand total for shipping over 9 lbs is $413.  

Alaska Airlines ~ 

A pet in a small (21″L x 16″W x 15″H or "100 size") or medium kennel (28"L by 20.5"W by 21.5"H or "200 size") weighing 20 to 25 lbs. (total with kennel/pet/food/cup of water/paperwork/bedding) from anywhere in the USA to anywhere in the USA, is about $189.66 (rounded up = $190).  If you add the $6 in declared value (insurance), it is $196 total airfare.  

 Total flight cost:  $210.00  for a medium or large sized kennel. 

 Add $30 for the "100" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

Grand total for shipping a puppy in a "100" kennel is $290.

Add $39 for the "200" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

 Grand total for shipping a puppy in a "200" kennel is $299.


Here are the airline numbers if you want to call to find out the details and costs to ship a pet: 

Alaskan Airlines (also good prices, may beat Continental!)
800-225-2752 
American Airlines (also good prices, may beat Continental!)
800-227-4622 
Continental Airlines (merged with United, flight is $189 flat rate + fees for 9 lbs. and under) 
800-575-3335 
Delta Airlines 
800-352-2746 
Northwest Airlines 
800-692-2746 
United Airlines (merged with Continental, flight is $189 flat rate + fees for 9 lbs. and under) 
800-575-3335 (was 800-UA-CARGO)  
Southwest Airlines... ACCEPT PETS IN THE CABIN ONLY, WITH A PASSENGER -$100 fee and no health certif. is required!   
1-800-435-9792 

There are no fees for you to pay when you pick up your kitten/puppy.  Just show your Photo ID.  The kennel is yours to keep.  As are all the things included with the puppy in the kennel!  The health certificate is good to fly the puppy for 10 days, then it expires.  


United is not dependent on temperatures, as they are totally temp controlled.  
American Airlines (and all others) - are dependent on the temp, can't be too hot/cold at any point on the trip.   

***Add to the shipping cost...the cost of a health certificate (normally $65), and the cost of a kennel:  
Walmart has the best prices here ~ a medium "100" kennel is $30 with tax, and a large "200" kennel is $39 with tax.                        *Now they do not include the required food/water cups with the kennel, so they have to be purchased separately for $5. 

Examples:  

Continental/United Total flight cost:  $229.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $100 = Total for 9 lbs and under:  $329 

American Airlines Total flight cost:  $205.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $100 = Total for medium "100" kennel:  $305   

Continental/United Total flight cost:  $304.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $109 = Total for over 9 lbs:  $413 

American Airlines Total flight cost:  $210.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $109 = Total for large "200" kennel:  $319   

Alaska Airlines flight cost:  $190.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $100 = Total for medium "100"  kennel:  $290,  Total for large "200" kennel:  $299 

 

SHIPPING YOUR PUPPY OR KITTEN 

Whether you are buying a new puppy or kitten, taking a vacation with your pet or moving across country you may be faced with the issue of shipping live cargo through the airlines. Here is some "need to know" information to help your puppy or kitten have a successful trip. 

Requirements to Ship: 

Animals must be at least 8 weeks of age. 

Shipping kennel or cage must meet standards for size, ventilation, strength and design. 

Animals must have enough room to stand up and turn around. 

Kennels must be equipped with one food and water cup. 

Kennels must be marked with shipper's name, address and phone number and pick-up person's name, address and phone number (if different from shipper), 

Live Animal Stickers should be applied to the kennel and the last time fed and watered indicated. 

Place newspaper or absorbent material on the bottom of the crate. 

Animal may not be exposed to temperatures of less than 45 degrees Fahrenheit unless there is an acclimation statement by a Veterinarian. 

Health Certificate must be issued by a licensed Veterinarian and be no more than 10 days old. 

Animals may not be brought to the airline more than 4 hours before a flight. 

Animals less than 16 weeks of age must be offered food and water if transit is more than 12 hours. 

Older animals must have food at least every 24 hours and water at least every 12 hours. 

Animals over 16 weeks must have rabies shots current (12 weeks for out of USA flights). 

Things to Consider 

If shipping international (including Hawaii) check the quarantine laws. 

Do not give your pet solid food in the six hours before the flight. 

Do not give your pet sedation without your veterinarians approval. 

Try to schedule a non-stop flight and avoid heavy travel times. 

If you are flying with your pet, be sure to tell the flight attendant or pilot. 

Place a familiar blanket, or your pet's favorite toy in the kennel. 



                                                                
INFO ON PURCHASING MY KITTENS AND PUPPIES:

DEPOSITS

If you put a deposit on a kitten (or puppy), no matter how beautiful they turn out to be, the price cannot go up.  It can only go down if something changes (like color or coat length).  Deposits are completely refundable until the kitten (or puppy) is 6 weeks old, for any reason.  (You don't have to fabricate some complicated story!)  After your kitten (or puppy) is 6 weeks old, deposits can float and be applied to a later kitten (or puppy), or switch to a different available kitten, (or available puppy)...but the deposit is not refundable.  


RETURNS

Healthy kittens (and puppies), that you can't keep, CANNOT be returned for a FULL refund.  If you need to return a healthy kitten (or puppy), I will try to help you resell it by taking photos of him/her for your ad, or providing you with my previous photos, and I will even make the ad and post it for you, and field any questions from potential new buyers, and even give you referrals if I can.  Just understand that as a kitten/puppy gets older, his/her price will decrease, as folks are usually looking for babies that are close to 8 weeks old.  If you bought a kitten/puppy for breeding and that kitten/puppy is resold to another breeder, they will hold their value better, though, as they get closer to being old enough to breed and/or show.  I realize life circumstances change, allergies can develop, and changes can occur that require a kitten or puppy to be re-homed. Just know that each time a kitten or a puppy leaves and returns, that can open the door to diseases coming into my otherwise closed and protected cattery and kennel. I do have to isolate the returned kitten/puppy, which stresses him/her, and sometimes leads to them becoming sick. That may lead to a vet bill for me, which stresses me!  Please think about the "big picture" before committing to becoming a new kitten or puppy owner, as several lives are affected by a new furry family member, including the baby's life, and mine!

Just food for thought:  6 1/2 years ago, the last healthy puppy I took back after less than 24 hrs., the buyers SWORE they took her home and nowhere else (they forgot to mention a little side-trip to Petco).  I stupidly put her back with her litter, as she was only gone for 14 hrs. and was whining so pitifully alone.  That led to Parvo coming into my otherwise healthy kennel and home, and the loss of 6 puppies, and a $5200 vet bill~!!!!!!!  We tried for almost 2 years to rid our home and kennel of the virus (which lives in San Diego for over a year on all surfaces), but finally we just had to move to a new home and start over.  (4 more puppies caught it before we moved, 1 died, even though they were only in ONE bleached bedroom at my house--ONLY, and we were SUPER careful!).  You can imagine how I feel about the question of "can you take my puppy back, I changed my mind, etc. etc. etc.".  So on that note, I just ask everyone to consider all the aspects of bringing a new puppy into your home, a baby to grow up and hopefully live for 15 to 20 years as a cherished member of your family.  I would rather answer a hundred questions than to have one puppy mistreated or worse because someone didn't think this through.  So feel free to ask...


HEALTH GUARANTEE

There is a 1 yr. health guarantee which covers any life-threatening diseases contracted at my home before you take your kitten (or puppy).  It also covers any congenital defect which may be discovered during the first year after you take the kitten (or puppy).  I agree to either:  cover the vet bills up to the cost of the kitten (or puppy), or refund your money up to the cost of the kitten (or puppy) to compensate for the vet bills, even if you don't chose to use the vet to correct the problem, or give you another acceptable kitten (or puppy) at the time, or in the future.  You do not have to give your kitten (or puppy) back, whichever way you chose to go.  It is your choice which of the three ways you want to go.  You DO have to send me the vet statement as to what is wrong, and how much it will cost to correct the problem.  Also give the vet your permission to talk to me if necessary.  Sometimes I need to ask questions about a problem in case there is something I need to change in my breeding program to eliminate or avoid that in the future.  Sometimes I have noticed a defect, like an umbilical hernia, a crooked tail, or a rear dewclaw, and I will deduct an amount from the original price to compensate for that.  If it is not my baby, then the breeder who has me sell that kitten or puppy is always on board with that.  Then we do not breed that mom to that dad again.  If I see a defect, I always disclose it to a buyer.  I will also help find the least expensive vet to "fix" the defect, if desired.  My goal is to never have any defects, but if they exist, I try to make sure the baby and the buyer have a happy ending!   


SPAY/NEUTER CONTRACTS

I could give you a form that you would sign requiring you to spay/neuter your kitten (or puppy), and withhold papers, or refund money, or give you some incentive to do that, or legal punishment if you didn't do that, but I am not the spay/neuter police.  That takes a lot of time and effort to follow up everyone in all parts of the world where my kittens (or puppies) might go.  I also have found that anyone who plans to breed their kitten (or puppy) eventually without my knowledge or blessing, will lie and scheme to get around my requirements.  All I can say is that there is a LOT to know about breeding healthy, happy kittens (and puppies), and to know what to do with them when they are weaned.  It is not all a piece of cake, especially when things go wrong.  Vet bills are expensive, and having little bodies instead of little babies will make you wish you had been more responsible!  Breeding Munchkins especially, as they are dwarf cats, is more delicate than breeding regular cats.  To avoid unwanted, unhealthy, or disfigured kittens, and to make the experience a good one, I am willing to help anyone learn to breed healthy, happy kittens if you want to do it the right way, by papering the cats and not endangering the mother cat and babies with a poor diet, the wrong male, an unsuitable environment, or any other of the many mistakes untrained breeders often make.  You can take advantage of my 21+ years of experience by being responsible and prepared and getting educated.  The same offer stands for breeding your Dachshund.  OR, you can GET YOUR KITTEN OR PUPPY SPAYED OR NEUTERED by 5 to 6 mos. of age and avoid all of this.  After all, you are paying good money for an awesome pet, I am trusting you to be an equally awesome owner!


As far as the registration papers, they are ordered at the time you pay for them, and mailed
as soon as I get them.  There is no late fee with TICA.  

SO, you are now fully informed, I hope.  I have tried to compile the most complete information
I can, mindful of ways to save money and still cover all of your bases, but if you have questions,
please just ask.  

Thank you for your interest,  
Charlotte

 

 I Love My Little Kitty

Author Unknown

I love my little kitty, she makes my house a home.
She always is my best friend, I never feel alone.
She makes me smile, she makes me laugh,
She fills my heart with love ...
Did some breeder breed her, or did she fall down from above?
 
I've never been a breeder, seen life through their eyes,
I hold my little kitty and just sit and criticize.
I've never known their anguish, I've never felt their pain,
The caring of their charges, through snow or wind and rain.
 
I've never sat the whole night through, waiting for babies to be born,
The stress and trepidation when they're still not there by dawn.
 
I've never felt the heartache, of a little life in my hands,
This darling little baby, who weighs but 60 grams.
 
Should you do that instead of this ....or this instead of that,
Alone you fight, and hope one day, he'll grow to be a cat,
and bring joy to another being, and make a house a home,
You know it's all just up to you, you'll fight this fight alone.
 
Formula, bottles, heating pads, you've got to get this right,
Two hourly feeds for this tiny guy, throughout the day and night.
In your heart you know, you're almost sure to lose the fight,
to save this little baby, but God willing ... you just MIGHT.
 
Day one he's in there fighting, you say a silent prayer,
Day two & three, he's doing well, with lots of love and care.
Day four & five ... he's still alive, your hopes soar to the heavens,
Day six he slips away again, dies in your hands day seven.
 
You take this little angel, and bury him alone,
With aching heart and burning tears, and an exhausted groan,
You ask yourself "Why do this? ... why suffer all this pain?"
But see the joy your kittens bring... it really self explains.
 
So, when you think of breeders and label them with "greed",
Think about what they endure to fill another's need.
 
When you buy a kitten and with your precious dollars part,
You only pay with money ... we pay with our heart.
 
 

 

 

 

_________________________

 

Puppy Info:   

_________________________



Here is some info I have compiled that will hopefully answer any questions you may have about my puppies (and kitties).  
I hope you find it helpful (ahead of when you would think of these questions!), and I hope you don't overload on information!  
AND, if you find any mistakes, or think of things I should add, please let me know!  

Thanks a bunch,
Charlotte


Puppy Vaccines:  

(From latest research, and from on-line vet sites and sites that supply vaccines):

Puppies receive antibodies from their mother through the placenta and after they are born, through the colostrum (the first milk). The age at which puppies can effectively be immunized is proportional to the amount of antibody protection the young animals received from their mother.  Antibodies are small disease-fighting proteins produced by certain types of cells called ‘B cells.’  The proteins are made in response to 'foreign' particles such as bacteria or viruses.  These antibodies bind with certain proteins (antigens) on foreign particles like bacteria, to help inactivate them.  High levels of maternal antibodies present in a puppy’s bloodstream will block the effectiveness of a vaccine. When the maternal antibodies drop to a low enough level in the young animal, immunization by a commercial vaccine will work to help protect your puppy/dog against disease.  Giving puppies vaccines starting at 6 weeks, and continuing until 16 weeks is the preferred time-frame for the best method of building antibodies against the most common canine diseases.  Keep your new puppy away from public areas (sidewalks, beaches, parks, rest stops, stores-especially ones like Petco, parks, schools, etc.) until a week after his/her last shot at 16 weeks.  That gives the vaccine a chance to build the antibodies necessary to resist bad diseases like Parvo and Distemper.  Then if your doggie comes down with something, it should be a milder case.  

PUPPY VACCINATIONS
5-8 wks first Parvovirus** immunization, then a booster in every puppy shot:   For puppies at high risk (San Diego is a HIGH risk area for Parvo).  
6, 9, 12, 15 wks or 8, 12, 16 wks Combination vaccine* without leptospirosis.
Coronavirus:  Where Coronavirus is a concern (recommended in San Diego).  One vaccination at 12 weeks or older (16 weeks is preferred) is the only time necessary, according to the latest research at UC Davis.
Rabies:  Given by your local veterinarian (age at vaccination may vary according to local law-1st vaccination at 5 mos. of age in San Diego).
15 or 16 wks:  leptospirosis ONLY where it is a concern (not a concern in San Diego), or if traveling to an area where it occurs.  This is an unstable vaccine, so do not give it unless you live in an area that has a problem with lepto.  

ADULT VACCINATIONS  
Coronavirus:  Where Coronavirus is a concern (recommended in San Diego).  One vaccination at 16 weeks or older is the only time necessary, according to the latest research at UC Davis.  Every dog should have at least ONE Coronavirus in their life.   The vet can test for the presence of antibodies to see if the vaccine is still strong enough in the dog's system, if desired.  
Lyme:  Where Lyme disease is a concern (optional, but recommended for San Diego) or if traveling.   
Adult Combination vaccine*:  Include leptospirosis ONLY where it is a concern (not a concern in San Diego), or if traveling to an area where it occurs.
Coronavirus:  Where coronavirus is a concern (recommended in San Diego).  One vaccination at 16 weeks or older is the only time necessary, according to the latest research at UC Davis.  
Rabies:  Given by your local veterinarian (time interval between vaccinations may vary according to local law-1st vaccination at 5 mos. of age in San Diego, and that lasts for one year). These recommendations vary depending on the age, breed, weight, and health status of the dog, the potential of the dog to be exposed to the disease, the type of vaccine, whether the dog is used for breeding, and the geographical area where the dog lives or may visit.  Usually the first Rabies vaccination lasts for 1 yr., then you can choose a 1, 2, or 3 yr. vaccine after that.  
Bordetella and parainfluenza:  For complete canine (kennel) cough protection, we recommend Intra-Trac III ADT.  For dogs that are shown, in field trials, or are boarded, we recommend vaccination every six to twelve months with Intra-Trac III ADT.  It takes about 2 weeks for the vaccine to produce enough antibodies to protect the dog from Bordetella.  

*A combination vaccine, often called a 5- way vaccine, usually includes adenovirus cough and hepatitis, canine distemper, parainfluenza, and parvovirus. Some combination vaccines may also include leptospirosis (7-way vaccines) and/or coronavirus.  The inclusion of either canine adenovirus-1 or adenovirus- 2 in a vaccine will protect against both adenovirus cough and hepatitis; adenovirus-2 is highly preferred.

**Some puppies may need additional vaccinations against parvovirus after 15 weeks of age. Consult with your local veterinarian.


Here are some web sites that may be useful to some folks:  


Picking a name for your puppy (or kitty):  

http://www.greatcatnames.com/pages/browse.php
OR:
http://worldsbestcatnames.com/catnamesm.html  
OR:
http://www.laziblues.com/names.html


Great names for Chocolate or Lilac puppies and kitties:    

http://www.chocolatecats.com/cat-names.htm


Potty training your new puppy:  

http://modernpuppies.com/


Nail trimming:  

http://www.healthypet.com/PetCare/PetsMatter/ReadMore.aspx?new_key=8c67d191-bc87-4f60-871d-3770848a05d2&nar_key=f48ab952-f738-4fa2-88ca-af5f74ba4f7c&type=VSNP


Cat and Dog "Panties" and "Belly Bands" to prevent going potty, or marking, in the wrong place:  

http://www.designerdoggie.net/

http://www.poochieheaven.com/dogpanties.html

http://www.designerdoggie.net/special.html

http://www.puppybuns.org/

http://www.rockstar-puppy.com/potty---cleanup.html

http://stores.ebay.com/Castle-Paws-Designs?_trksid=p4340.l2563

http://www.mythicbells.com/stud_pants.htm#Photos


Genetic and health testing:  

http://www.vgl.ucdavis.edu/services/cat/


Removing a tick from an animal:  

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/pic/article.cfm?c=3307&articleid=62&d=155


AWESOME information for dog and cat owners in general, and for senior pets.  
It answers many questions:  

http://www.srdogs.com/Pages/care.fr.html


Treatment of Giardia in puppies/kittens/dogs/cats:  

http://bullmarketfrogs.com/blog/2009/01/treating-giardia-in-dogs/

http://www.revivalanimal.com/articles/giardia.html?a=REV130125P


I have three methods that I use for housetraining, and with puppies in a pen and not a lot of time to watch each individual one, I cannot begin the training, however the litter box method is pretty easy and foolproof.  You put a litter box (for a dog, from Petco, Petsmart, etc. for $15 to $25) in a pen with just room for a bed, (a few toys), and the litter box.  You use the old fashioned clay (cheap) cat litter, about an inch in the litter box.  After the pup only uses the litter box to go potty, supplemented by you taking him outside when you can, and you praise him A LOT whenever you see him potty in the right place, then you enlarge the pen (I use the X-pen, or exercise pen that has 8 panels, 2 ft-wide by 2 1/2 ft-tall).  The first size you make is 2 ft. by 4 ft.  That's one panel wide by two panels long.  The rest is folded up and clipped together.  The second phase, when the pup is perfect with just his bed and litter box, is to lengthen the pen to one panel by three panels (2 ft. by 6 ft.).  That gives him a floor area of 2X2 ft.  If he goes potty on the floor (tile or some other hard floor), then the pen shrinks back to 2X4 ft.  for a few days of perfection.  Then it is stretched to 2X6 again until he only goes potty in the box, or outside when you take him.  Always praise him when he goes in the right place.  You can put his food and water, or just water (hooked to the pen in hook-on bowls) with him, or control it by 3 meals (or 2 meals) a day.  You take him out to potty after he eats if you control the time he is fed.  When the 2X6 pen is perfect with no accidents for 2 or 3 days, then you make the pen into a full circle of 8 panels.  (Or a rectangle).  Still on a hard floor.  Again only the bed, toys, and litter box are inside the pen, and the bowls hooked to the pen, if you do that.  If he has an accident on the floor, you start over with each stage for about 3 days of perfection for each stage.  Finally when the 8 panel pen is perfect for about 4 days or so, you can give him a room, blocked off from the rest of the house, with a hard floor, and the litter box and bed and toys are in that room.  If he has an accident, you start all over.  Usually they don't, but if they are sloppy, or stubborn, they might.  After he is perfect in the room for about a week, you can let him run the house if you are watching him.  Any accidents will mean you start the process over.  After he is perfect that way for about a week, then he can have the run of the house.  I always put puppies secure in a room like the kitchen or laundry room when I'm away so they don't chew the electrical cords or other big no-no's!  This process seems to work for all small dogs.  They don't like to be put on "time out", shrinking back to the small pen more than once or twice, if at all.  They get it pretty fast, and either use the litter box, or outside.  We keep the litter box inside for emergencies or bad weather, and it hardly ever gets used.  After they use it, you just remove the poop, but leave the pee smell there, and just change the litter about every 3 to 7 days, as necessary.
I hope this helps you in your potty training decision!
       Here is a link to the Dog.com site showing an exercise pen like I'm talking about.  This is a really good price.  Dog.com is an EXCELLENT site!
                        
         http://www.dog.com/item/dogcom-dog-exercise-pen-black/
                        
                        Thanks,
                        Charlotte
                        
       The dog food I like is from Paul's Pet Food in Escondido.  To order for a home delivery (free), just call Paul's Pet Food at (760)787-9991, or 1-888-687-3294. Their puppy food is about $33 for 25 lbs., and it is EXCELLENT food!  They have treats, too!  Just ask for a selection of a free treat of each kind to try with your puppy.  I include a sample bag of food to get the puppy started, and their literature so you can read about the food.  They have franchises around the country.  Their food was never on the pet food recall, and it is made in the USA!
        
I get great deals on cat and dog stuff, and blankets at the 99 CENT STORE.  
        
        
       When you want pet beds, kennels, clothing, litter boxes and supplies, litter, leashes, collars, and some types of food, WalMart is hard to beat!  
        
        
       The best deal on dog harnesses (and some other things) is at Dog.com in my opinion, and at Home Goods in Poway (and other places).  
        
        
If your new baby has diarrhea, constipation, or a sore bottom:  

Stress, constipation, diarrhea, diet change, water change, change in activity level, hairballs, parasites, and/or the change of the PH balance in the intestines (usually due to stress) can cause an upset digestive tract.  If it is parasites, then you need pills, powder, or a liquid over several weeks to kill all of the parasites.  Call me, and if I have it, I'll send/give you what you need at my cost only-or free.  If your baby has a sore bottom, you can use a very small amount of Preparation H, or any hemorrhoid treatment (like Tucks)...you can use a little bit of it on the outside of the rectum.  After that you have to interact with or be with the baby to make sure he does not lick it off (it may be harmful to the kitty if he licks it off and swallows it).  After the salve (or Tucks) has been on his rectum for about 15 to 20 min., you can start applying warm compresses this way:  
Apply a warm compress to the rectal area.  If you have antibacterial soap in the house (Hibitane or chlorhexidene soap would be ideal) you can add a little to a cup of warm water.  Put a washcloth in, then wring it out.  Hold the warm, damp wash cloth to the swollen area for 10 minutes, rewarming it every 2 minutes or so.  Wipe the area with a plain wet washcloth and pat dry.  Do this 4 times a day, then as needed after that.    

Another thing you can do is this:  
Cut a human infant glycerin suppository lengthwise.  A small kitten should get no more than 1/8 of one suppository.  Insert into the rectum and massage the kitten’s belly, back, and bottom.  The suppository will slowly melt, and you may see a tiny bit of clear liquid come out of the rectum.  After about 15 minutes, (try to keep the kitten from licking his bottom, but glycerine is not really harmful), start applying warm compresses as described above.  Do this about 4 times the first day, then as needed after that.  

The last (but very effective) thing to do that will help is:  
Surprisingly, a simple can of pumpkin puree is a safe and natural home remedy for treating both constipation and diarrhea in cats and dogs (and people!).  Constipation is a common problem which often happens in dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens.  Some pets just need more fiber in their diet, especially if they eat dry cat or dog food.  Pumpkin is a wonderful source of fiber and has high water content.  If your pet is constipated, the fiber in the pumpkin will soften the stools.  If your pet is experiencing diarrhea, the fiber in the pumpkin will absorb the water in your pet's digestive system which will help make the stools firmer.
The weight of your pet will determine how much pumpkin to give them.  A pet which weighs less than five pounds should be given 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of pumpkin puree a day.  A pet which weighs 6 to 15 pounds should be given 1-2 teaspoons of pumpkin puree a day.  A 15-35 pound pet should receive 1-2 tablespoons daily, and a pet 35 pounds and up (or a person) can be given 2-5 tablespoons of pumpkin puree daily.  If you find your pet's stool becomes too runny, cut back on the amount of pumpkin.  The pumpkin can be given once a day, or half in the morning and half in the evening.  
Some cats seem to have a brand preference when it comes to canned pumpkin. If they don't seem to care for Libby's Pumpkin Puree, try Festal canned pumpkin, or one of several other brands.  Some cats will only eat the pumpkin if you add a little warm water.  Some love it straight out of the can, and some don't.  Do NOT mistakenly purchase pumpkin pie filling which has spices and extra sugar added.
**To keep the can of pumpkin puree from going bad, freeze individual teaspoon or tablespoon portions in an ice cube tray. Once they are frozen, you can dump the cubes of pumpkin in a freezer bag and take them out as needed.

Good riddance to Fleas, Ticks, Ear Mites, Mange, Heartworm, and Roundworm:  

The flea protection I use is Revolution (in the UK the same thing is called Stronghold).  Advantage and Frontline are also good, but I like Revolution (or Stronghold) because, not only does it kill fleas and ticks, it also kills ear mites, skin mites, and HEARTWORM!  It also does a pretty good number on roundworm (kills most in dogs, and all in cats).  I order it from PetShed.com in Australia or PetBucket in the UK, since you don't need a vet's prescription.  Also, if you get 6 mos. at a time, PetShed sends you free dog wormer tablets that work great to get rid of ALL worms, including tapeworm. 

http://www.petshed.com/products/item109.asp  

ALSO...another excellent site with free shipping for medicine, flea treatments, shampoos, and other wonderful things that you often need a prescription for, but not with these guys, is: 

http://fleastuff.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PLST&Store_Code=F

And finally, the other site that I have used is this one.  I am VERY dissatisfied with them now!  ...

http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Categories/Flea/%22Revolution%20Dogs%22  

This site may be the cheapest if you use a coupon from a coupon site on line, but it can take anywhere from 14 to 60 days to receive your order!!!  Be prepared to wait a VERY LONG time to get your products!  And PetBucket is cheaper and way faster anyway!!!  

Just note that often sites with free shipping do charge tax, and sites that charge shipping, often don't charge tax.  

Shipping can be less than the tax!  

Note to folks ordering "Revolution" ~ "Stronghold" (selamectin) by Pfizer is the UK version of "Revolution".  It has the same formulation and ingredients as "Revolution", but is MUCH less expensive!  Here is the link to a site called PetBucket that sells Stronghold (and Revolution) with no prescription.  This is the dog Stronghold (that I also use on my cats):  

http://www.petbucket.com/Listing/Filter/?categoryId=4521471&brandId=2271265&sortItem=0&sortDirection=0&page=11

Here is the method I have formulated for using Revolution (or Stronghold) on my dogs and cats-I'm not a vet, but just someone who likes to save money whenever possible!  Use this formula at your own risk!  I have used it successfully for many years...

The Revolution can be ordered (on line) without a prescription from Petshed.com or PetBucket.com or fleastuff.com, who are all animal medical suppliers in Australia (or the UK).  It takes from 7 to 14 days to arrive (unless you use vidals.com who may take up to 2 months!).  It is less expensive from those sites, and PetShed.com includes 8 tablets of free Canex (each tablet treats 20 lbs. of dog weight), an xlnt complete wormer tablet-(I cut the pills into quarters-each treats a 5 lb. puppy). You can order the size tubes to treat a 45 to 85 lb. dog (the largest offered on petshed.com, PetBucket.com or on vidalspets.com), or on fleastuff.com you can order the largest size made:  80 to 135 lb. dog size, and then divide it.  

FOR DOGS:  

You figure 4 drops of Revolution per pound of DOG.  In other words...a 6 lb. dog would get 24 drops, and an 8 lb. dog would get 32 drops, etc.  When (and if) the dog starts itching again before a month has passed, add 2 to 3 extra drops at that point, and give it a couple of days before adding 2 more drops, until you find the right amount to protect your dog for an entire month.  It will be close to 4 drops per lb. (with maybe a few extra drops if your dog has a very thick or long coat, or if it is a bad "flea infested" or hot time of year).  I use a couple of extra drops per month in the warmer months, then back off a drop or two in the colder months.  It's better to err on the side of caution and increase slowly until the treatment lasts a complete month.  After you open the tube, you need to keep it upright to protect the unused part from evaporating.  I keep mine, closed tightly, taped to the inside of the cupboard door in the kitchen.  That way I know where it is for the next month, and no kids, pets, etc. will get it or knock it over during the month!  If you lay it down, it will evaporate within 2 days, even though it is closed tightly!  I'm not a vet or a sales rep for their companies, just a regular person who likes to save money.  AND not being a vet, I can tell you that I also use the dog Revolution (or Stronghold) on my cats.  

FOR CATS:  

Instead of 4 drops per pound, I use 3 drops per pound of CAT weight. It's the same chemical for a dog and a cat, just a lower strength for the cat!  So a 2 lb. kitten would get 6 drops of dog Revolution, and a 5 lb. kitty gets 10 or 11 drops (add one to two extra drops if the cat has extra long or thick hair), and so on.  A ten lb. cat would get about 30 to 32 drops, 33 or 34 drops if it is a longhair cat.  As with a dog, if the dose does not protect for one month, you can add a drop or 2 to your formula next time you use it, and by trial and error, see how much it will take to protect your particular cat, with his/her particular coat, in the warmer or colder months, but it will be close to 3 drops per pound of cat weight, plus one or two or three drops, depending on the cat's coat, weight, and the season.  (No guarantees, no lawsuits, please...but it works for me and my animals just great!  I have never had a problem, and it saves me a lot of money).  Figure a tube of 80 to 135 lb. dog size Revolution (or Stronghold).  Use the lower weight of 80 lbs.  At 3 drops a lb., that will do roughly 10 10-lb. cats, or about 25 to 30 3-lb. kittens!  If you have puppies, it will do about 7 to 8 10-lb. dogs, and about 20 4-lb. puppies.  Not to mention it will do 4 20-lb. dogs, or 2 40-lb. dogs.  You can spend a LOT of bucks to have your small pets protected by buying a single tube for each one, or you can just buy the giant size tube and divide it.  Other than the protection from fleas and ticks for cats and dogs, the other blessings are the protection from ear mites, heartworm, skin mites and roundworm!  

From the manufacturer:  

Revolution is recommended for use in dogs six weeks of age or older and cats eight weeks of age and older for the following parasites and indications: 

Dogs:  

Revolution kills adult fleas and prevents flea eggs from hatching for one month and is indicated for the prevention and control of flea infestations (Ctenocephalides felis) prevention of heartworm disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis and the treatment and control of ear mite (Otodectes cynotis) infestations. Revolution also is indicated for the treatment and control of sarcoptic mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) and for the control of tick infestations due to (Dermacentor variabilis).  

Cats:  

Revolution kills adult fleas and prevents flea eggs from hatching for one month and is indicated for the prevention and control of flea infestations (Ctenocephalides felis) prevention of heartworm disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis and the treatment and control of ear mite (Otodectes cynotis) infestations. Revolution is also indicated for the treatment and control of roundworm (Toxocara cati) and intestinal hookworm (Ancylostoma tubaeforme) infections in cats.  

        

GOOD AS GOLD

Here are a five golden rules to follow when attempting to reshape your pet’s behavior:
        
        Start behavior training early. The best time to teach is when your pets are puppies or kittens, when they are most receptive. But do not think you cannot teach an old dog (or cat) a new trick, because you can.
              * Make the training session fun. Never try to teach your pet when you are feeling harried or stressed. Animals can tap into our stress levels and sense impatience. Be encouraging, upbeat, and patient.
              * Keep the lessons short. Typically, animals do not have a long attention span. Spend no more than 5 minutes at a time when training a cat and 10 minutes, on average, with a dog.
              * Identify what motivates your pet. Pets are much more willing to learn a new behavior when they anticipate a reward as the payoff. For cats, it can be a feathered toy you dangle in front of their eyes for them to chase or offering a pinch of catnip. For dogs, it can be tiny pieces of premium treats you dole out each time they comply with your commands.
              * Communicate clearly and com­pletely. Pets not only heed your vocal tones, but they pay a lot of attention to your gestures and postures. So, if you want your dog to sit, for example, be sure to use the same hand signal each time and do not make it similar to your signal for your dog to roll over or to stay.
              *
        Hopefully, these general guidelines will get you and your pet on the right foot toward good behavior. Following are a few species-specific considerations to keep in mind.
        
        COUNTERING YOUR CAT’S BAD HABITS
        You can learn to “outfox” your feline, says Dr. Arnold Plotnick, owner of the Manhattan Cat Specialists Clinic in New York City and medical editor for Catnip magazine. First, identify the misbehavior, stop it, and then redirect your cat to an. There are somethings you might not even thinks of that can poison your dog, such as Tylenol, onions, pot pourri etc..
        Even applying typical flea and tick preventions can be hazardous unless you use the appropriate products how they are supposed to be used.  
        (Don't use Hartz Flea & Tick drops that you get at the department stores like Wal-Mart and K-Mart.  It can cause loss of hair, seizures, and death)!  
        

Fading Kitten and Puppy Syndrome
(Failure to Thrive)        

 

So, what causes this?   Actually many things, but one thing we can all control at home is...the cleaning products we use.  Yes, bleach is great, and so is Formula 409, and Comet, and those cleaning wipes, and soap and water, too, but don't just clean and leave the dried film on the floors, furniture, counters, shelves, tables, sinks, toys, dishes, etc.  The kitty or doggie will walk over these surfaces, then lick their feet, and ingest small amounts of left-over cleaning product.  The answer is to wipe down cleaned surfaces with paper towels, clean sponges, or mops wet with plain water!  Yes, please clean off these already-disinfected surfaces with a water wipe-down, to provide a non-toxic surface for our pets to safely walk/play/sleep on.  That includes the toys and bowls!  Then you can sleep well  (-:   


        
                Top 10 Pet Poisons of 2009
                 
                With various dangers lurking in corners and cabinets, the home can be a minefield of poisons for our pets. In 2009, the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) in Urbana, IL, handled more than 140,000 cases of pets exposed to toxic substances, many of which included everyday household products. Don’t leave it up to Fido or Fluffy to keep themselves safe. Below is a list of the top 10 pet poisons that affected our furry friends in 2009.
        
Human Medications
        For several years, human medications have been number one on the ASPCA’s list of common hazards, and 2009 was no exception. Last year, the ASPCA managed 45,816 calls involving prescription and over-the-counter drugs such as painkillers, cold medications, antidepressants and dietary supplements. Pets often snatch pill vials from counters and nightstands or gobble up medications accidentally dropped on the floor, so it’s essential to keep meds tucked away in hard-to-reach cabinets.
        
Insecticides
        In our effort to battle home invasions by unwelcome pests, we often unwittingly put our furry friends at risk. In 2009, our toxicologists fielded 29,020 calls related to insecticides. One of the most common incidents involved the misuse of flea and tick products—such as applying the wrong topical treatment to the wrong species. Thus, it’s always important to talk to your pet’s veterinarian before beginning any flea and tick control program.
        
People Food
        People food like grapes, raisins, avocado, alcoholic drinks, and products containing xylitol, like gum, can seriously disable our furry friends, and accounted for more than 17,453 cases in 2009. One of the worst offenders—chocolate—contains large amounts of methylxanthines, which, if ingested in significant amounts, can cause vomiting, diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst, urination, hyperactivity, and in severe cases, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors and seizures.
        
Plants
        Common houseplants were the subject of 7,858 calls to APCC in 2009. Varieties such as azalea, rhododendron, sago palm, lilies, kalanchoe and schefflera are often found in homes and can be harmful to pets. Lilies are especially toxic to cats, and can cause life-threatening kidney failure even in small amounts.
        
Veterinary Medications
Even though veterinary medications are intended for pets, they’re often misapplied or improperly dispensed by well-meaning pet parents.    In 2009, the ASPCA managed 7,680 cases involving animal-related preparations such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heartworm preventatives, de-wormers, antibiotics, vaccines and nutritional supplements.
        
Rodenticides
        Last year, the ASPCA received 6,639 calls about pets who had accidentally ingested rat and mouse poisons. Many baits used to attract rodents contain inactive ingredients that are attractive to pets as well. Depending on the type of rodenticide, ingestions can lead to potentially life-threatening problems for pets including bleeding, seizures or kidney damage.  
        
Household Cleaners
        Everybody knows that household cleaning supplies can be toxic to adults and children, but few take precautions to protect their pets from common agents such as bleaches, detergents and disinfectants. Last year, the ASPCA received 4,143 calls related to household cleaners. These products, when inhaled by our furry friends, can cause serious gastrointestinal distress and irritation to the respiratory tract.  Please don't let cats/kittens walk in the wet surface left by the disposable cleaning cloths!!!  
        
Heavy Metals
        It’s not too much loud music that constitutes our next pet poison offender.  Instead, it’s heavy metals such as lead, zinc and mercury, which accounted for 3,304 cases of pet poisonings in 2009.  Lead is especially pernicious, and pets are exposed to it through many sources, including consumer products, paint chips, linoleum, and lead dust produced when surfaces in older homes are scraped or sanded.
        
Garden Products
        It may keep your grass green, but certain types of fertilizer and garden products can cause problems for outdoor cats and dogs. Last year, the ASPCA fielded 2,329 calls related to fertilizer exposure, which can cause severe gastric upset and possibly gastrointestinal obstruction.
        
Chemical Hazards
        
        In 2009, the ASPCA handled approximately 2,175 cases of pet exposure to chemical hazards. A category on the rise, chemical hazards—found in ethylene glycol antifreeze, paint thinner, drain cleaners and pool/spa chemicals—form a substantial danger to pets. Substances in this group can cause gastrointestinal upset, depression, respiratory difficulties and chemical burns.
        
        Prevention is really key to avoiding accidental exposure, but if you suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please contact your veterinarian or the Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435.
        

        
        Pro/Con info on Early Spay/Neuter 
        
(Personally I feel females should be spayed at about 6 mos., and males should be neutered at about 5 mos. of age)...


Site with negative feelings and info on early spay/neutering of cats/dogs:  

http://www.2ndchance.info/spayneuter.htm 


Article more in favor of early spay/neutering of cats/dogs:  

                                 

       Early Age Altering


                           Susan Little, DVM, DABVP (Feline)
                                            ©2006
Early age or prepuberal altering (EAA) refers to gonadectomy (spay or neuter) between six and sixteen weeks of age and is now more commonly practiced as veterinarians gain experience with pediatric anesthesia and surgery. The traditional gonadectomy age is about six months, although in some countries, gonadectomy may be delayed until one year of age.  Prepuberal gonadectomy is altering before the onset of puberty, which may occur in females between 4 and 21 months of age and in males between 8 and 10 months of age. Prepuberal gonadectomy has been commonly recommended by veterinarians for many years to avoid unwanted pregnancy and to reduce the risk of mammary cancer. What is new is the earlier age at which prepuberal altering is now being performed. EAA is one desirable approach for control of pet overpopulation as it enables shelters to perform pre-adoption altering and avoids the risk of owner non-compliance with altering contracts.  Increasingly, it is recognized there are also health benefits to EAA.  Major veterinary organizations around the world are supportive of EAA, including:
    • American Veterinary Medical Assoc.
    • Canadian Veterinary Medical Assoc.
    • British Small Animal Veterinary Assoc
    • European Society of Feline Medicine
    • Feline Advisory Bureau (U.K.)
    • Winn Feline Foundation
Health Issues
Objections to EAA have included concerns about:
    • Effect on growth
    • Long bone fracture risk
    • Obesity
    • Behavioral changes
    • Increased risk of disease
    • Safety of surgery and anesthesia in pediatric patients
Testosterone and estrogen assist maturation of the growth plates in long bones. Growth stops when physeal closure occurs. Intact cats have distal radial physeal closure at 1 year of age or older. Cats altered at 7 weeks and 7 months of age had distal radial physeal closure about 8 weeks later than intact cats. The effect of this delay in physeal closure is
unknown, but adult size in cats is not significantly affected by age of altering. It has been suggested that delayed physeal closure may predispose cats to Salter fractures of the
femoral capital growth plates. The femoral capital growth plate normally closes between 7.5 and 10 months of age. Other risk factors for this type of fracture include obesity and gender/reproductive status (neutered male). The risk of fracture would be the same for cats altered at any age that results in delayed physeal closure, not just EAA cats. These
fractures appear to be rare in the altered cat population. One large study (Spain et al) failed to find any association between EAA and long bone fracture risk in cats.  Obesity is a multifactorial problem involving diet, exercise, age and other factors. Altered cats have a lower metabolic rate than sexually intact cats regardless of the age at gonadectomy. Altered male cats require 28% less calories than intact male cats and altered female cats require 33% fewer calories than intact female cats. Clients should be counseled on the dietary needs of altered cats to avoid obesity. Compared to altered cats, sexually intact cats show less affection to humans and more aggression to other cats. One study has shown that EAA male cats are less aggressive to vets, and exhibit fewer problems with urine spraying. Spain et al showed there is no
difference in the prevalence of significant behaviour problems based on age at altering.  Lower urinary tract disease in cats is caused by a wide variety of factors such as diet, water intake and stressors. The diameter of the male urethra is no smaller in EAA cats than in intact cats. Age at altering does not influence risk of urinary tract disease; in fact, one study showed a lower risk of urinary tract obstruction in EAA male cats. Several long term studies have been performed to assess health risks of EAA. These studies confirm that EAA is not associated with any increased risk of disease, but rather is associated with
a lower risk of some diseases (such as asthma and gingivitis).
Anesthesia and Surgery
Pediatric patients have unique perioperative, anesthetic and surgical issues. With the use of safe and effective techniques, it has been shown that EAA does not increase morbidity or mortality associated with anesthesia and surgery. In fact, kittens altered at less than 12 weeks had lower postoperative complication rates than those altered at over 23 weeks of age in one study. There are surgical benefits to EAA that include less bleeding, improved
visualization of organs, shorter surgery times and more rapid recoveries.  Pediatric patients distribute and metabolize drugs differently, so the clinician must be careful with drug selection and doses. Bear in mind that renal and hepatic function does not reach adult levels until about 12-14 weeks of age. Certain anesthetic concerns must be addressed, such as the neonate’s rate dependent cardiac output, maintenance of breath rate, and minimizing dead space in anesthetic equipment. Certain anesthetic drugs should be avoided in pediatric patients, but many safe and effective drug protocols have been described. Hypothermia occurs easily due to the greater surface area:volume ratio of the neonate,
less subcutaneous fat and reduced ability to shiver. Hypothermia can cause bradycardia and prolonged recovery from anesthesia. The prep, surgery and recovery areas should be kept warm. Ensure kittens are never placed on cold metal surfaces. Use warmed blankets or circulating water blankets to maintain body temperature. Plastic “bubble pack”
wrapping is also useful for maintaining warmth. Warm the surgery prep solutions, and replace alcohol with sterile saline. Hypoglycemia occurs easily due to their small hepatic
glycogen reserves, so neonates should not be fasted for more than 2 to 3 hours before anesthesia. Within an hour of recovery, they should be offered a small meal. Kittens
unwilling to eat after an hour or more can be given oral dextrose to prevent hypoglycemia.  Certain surgical concerns must also be addressed. Meticulous hemostasis is necessary as tissues are more friable than in adults, so handle tissues gently. For males, perform closed castration via a single or double scrotal incision, tie off with absorbable suture or use
hemostatic clips and leave the scrotal incision open. For females, the OHE technique is the same as for a mature cat. It is best to close the skin with subcuticular sutures or tissue
adhesive and avoid skin sutures. Note that serous fluid in the abdomen of neonates is normal.


Five Rules for Successful Early Age Altering


1. Kittens should have a complete physical exam; have their first vaccination and treatment for parasites; postpone surgery if any illness or abnormality is found (including cryptorchidism)
2. Weigh each kitten to nearest 100 grams, calculate drug doses carefully
3. Combat hypoglycemia: withhold food for only 2-4 hours; feed a small meal within 1 hour of recovery; administer 50% dextrose orally to kittens with prolonged recoveries or those that will not eat post-op
4. Decrease stress: keep litters together before surgery in a warm, quiet environment; minimize handling; avoid IV injections; reunite litters as soon as possible after recovery
5. Combat hypothermia: insulate against cold surfaces, minimize hair coat clipping, avoid alcohol in preps, warm prep solutions, monitor rectal temperature, use supplemental heat sources (warm blankets, hot water bottles, heat lamps, etc.)

For more information:
The Cat Group (UK) Policy Statement:
http://www.fabcats.org/neut.html
Please Note: The Winn Feline Foundation provides the feline health information on this site as a service to
the public. Diagnosis and treatment of specific conditions should always be in consultation with one's own
veterinarian. The Winn Feline Foundation disclaims all warranties and liability related to the veterinary
information provided on this site.



San Diego Spay/Neuter info for low-cost sites:  

Here is the link to San Diego Pet Assistance.  They refer you to vets that give a discount in your area.  
This is for San Diego:
http://www.orgsites.com/ca/pet-assistance/
And this is for North County:
http://www.petassistancenorthcounty.org/
That includes SNAP....spay/neuter assistance program 
and The Neuter Scooter
Also there is the Feral Cat Coalition who might be able to get it done for free, it is also run by donations:
http://www.feralcat.com/ 

Some clinics and vets I have heard good things about:   

SNAP- Spay Neuter Action Project has the "Neuter Scooter" who charges $40 to spay or neuter a 
cat, and $45 to $50 for a dog.  (619) 525-3047  http://www.snap-sandiego.org/  (for lower income folks)

Pearson Animal Hospital in San Marcos, Ca. 92078                 (760)598-2512    http://pearsonvet.com/


The El Cajon vet is Agape Vet Hospital, Dr. Ganasi:  (these are his prices whether or not you go through Pet Assistance)
http://local.yahoo.com/info-20812266-ganasi-rolando-dvm-agape-veterinary-hospital-el-cajon
Cats:                                Dogs:
Fem  $50                          Fem    doesn't do them
Male  $40                         Male   $50

The Vet in Valley Center my friend Nancy used for low cost spay/neuter is Countryside.   Here is the link:
http://www.merchantcircle.com/business/Countryside.Veterinary.Clinic.760-749-3656 

The cat or dog cannot be in heat or pregnant, or there is an additional $10 to $15 fee.  The males have to have both testicles descended, or there is an additional fee based on the complication of the surgery.  
Pain medications beyond what is required for the actual surgery are optional and additional (usually $15 extra).
Blood work before surgery is optional, (not required), and an additional fee.

 

SHIPPING YOUR PUPPY OR KITTEN from San Diego:   

Here are the numbers, as well as helpful info pages about shipping a pet.  As far as how to do this, the kitten or puppy is technically old enough to fly at 8 weeks, but it is stressful to fly, and they are pretty scared when you pick them up at the airport.  That's why it is best to get a non-stop flight, or at least a flight with no changes, just one stop.  If that isn't possible, then no more than one change.  Every change is scary to them, and gives you one more opportunity for them to get lost, stolen, forgotten, or hurt.  It also takes longer.  I take the kitten/puppy in her kennel to the airport and give her to the airline usually one and a half hour (sometimes two hours are required) before the flight.  She (or he) will have water (frozen in a cup that attaches to the door-so it won't spill in transit to the plane), and food with her.  I also put newspaper in the bottom, a little soft blanket in the back, and shredded paper in the front.  Some airlines will let me put a soft, fluffy stuffed animal in with her.  I get her mom's (or littermates') smell on it (and the blanket) before it goes into the kennel.  Also I put a couple of toys with her.  That will become her "security" kitty or puppy, in the place of mom.  Then you go to the airport (either cargo, baggage, or ticketing--I will let you know), and pick her up about 1/2 to 1 hr. after landing.  I always get there when the plane lands and just wait!  It's stressful for me, too, until they are with me and OK.  I have had a few puppies and kittens shipped to me.  You pay for the kennel, the health certificate, and the airfare.  The cheapest (and best!) kennel I get is at WalMart for about $30 for a small/medium size "100", and about $39 for the medium/large size "200".  Now they do not include the required food/water cups with the kennel, so they have to be purchased separately for $5.  Most vets around me charge $65 to $90 for a health certificate (that's the health exam and certificate).  I will drive extra to get the least expensive one for you, within reason!  The health certificate is good for 10 days.   The one reason we couldn't ship is if it was too cold or hot at any point of the flight (and a few Airlines have closed cargo offices on Sunday in San Diego).  The airlines tell you the expected temperatures at each place the plane lands, and tell you if the weather is OK to ship.  Continental has merged with United.  It is temperature controlled the whole way, so the outside temps don't matter when you use them. 

The kitten (or puppy) comes with a bath, clean ears, trimmed nails, a little blanket, a toy or two, the fluffy "mom substitute" stuffed animal to ship with her, her TICA, CFA (or AKC) papers (if purchased), and her shot record (she will be current on shots and wormings).  There is a one year health guarantee covering any congenital defects, or any serious diseases that he/she would have contracted at my house.  I also put "Revolution" (for fleas, ear mites, skin mites, heartworm and roundworm) on him/her, if you would like.  It is safe for puppies and kittens, and it is better than Advantage or Frontline in my opinion.  If you prefer I don't use it, then I won't.  My babies do not have fleas, but I use it when they are 8 weeks old as a deterrent.  Also, the kennel is yours to keep. 

 

American Airlines ~ 

Total flight cost:  $205.00  for a medium sized ("100") kennel. 

Add $30 for the "100" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

Grand total for shipping a puppy in a "100" kennel is $305.

Total flight cost:  $210.00  for a larger sized ("200") kennel. 

Add $39 for the "200" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

 Grand total for shipping a puppy in a "200" kennel is $319.

Continental/United ~  

9 lbs. and under for pet and small or medium size kennel:  Flight base cost is $189 ~ Add USA freight processing fee/fuel surcharge/CA sales tax = $34, approx $223, & with $6 insurance, it is $229 for total airfare.  (The insurance/declared value of $6 is optional, but recommended).  Add $30 for a medium size kennel "100" and the food/water cups are $5, and $65 for health certificate.  

Grand total for shipping 9 lbs and under is $324. 

Add $39 for the "200" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

Grand total for shipping over 9 lbs is $413.  

Alaska Airlines ~ 

A pet in a small (21″L x 16″W x 15″H or "100 size") or medium kennel (28"L by 20.5"W by 21.5"H or "200 size") weighing 20 to 25 lbs. (total with kennel/pet/food/cup of water/paperwork/bedding) from anywhere in the USA to anywhere in the USA, is about $189.66 (rounded up = $190).  If you add the $6 in declared value (insurance), it is $196 total airfare.  

 Total flight cost:  $210.00  for a medium or large sized kennel. 

 Add $30 for the "100" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

Grand total for shipping a puppy in a "100" kennel is $290.

Add $39 for the "200" size kennel, $5 for food/water cups, and $65 for health certificate.  

 Grand total for shipping a puppy in a "200" kennel is $299.


Here are the airline numbers if you want to call to find out the details and costs to ship a pet: 

Alaskan Airlines (also good prices, may beat Continental!)
800-225-2752 
American Airlines (also good prices, may beat Continental!)
800-227-4622 
Continental Airlines (merged with United, flight is $189 flat rate + fees for 9 lbs. and under) 
800-575-3335 
Delta Airlines 
800-352-2746 
Northwest Airlines 
800-692-2746 
United Airlines (merged with Continental, flight is $189 flat rate + fees for 9 lbs. and under) 
800-575-3335 (was 800-UA-CARGO)  
Southwest Airlines... ACCEPT PETS IN THE CABIN ONLY, WITH A PASSENGER -$100 fee and no health certif. is required!   
1-800-435-9792 

There are no fees for you to pay when you pick up your kitten/puppy.  Just show your Photo ID.  The kennel is yours to keep.  As are all the things included with the puppy in the kennel!  The health certificate is good to fly the puppy for 10 days, then it expires.  


United is not dependent on temperatures, as they are totally temp controlled.  
American Airlines (and all others) - are dependent on the temp, can't be too hot/cold at any point on the trip.   

***Add to the shipping cost...the cost of a health certificate (normally $65), and the cost of a kennel:  
Walmart has the best prices here ~ a medium "100" kennel is $30 with tax, and a large "200" kennel is $39 with tax.                        *Now they do not include the required food/water cups with the kennel, so they have to be purchased separately for $5. 

Examples:  

Continental/United Total flight cost:  $229.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $100 = Total for 9 lbs and under:  $329 

American Airlines Total flight cost:  $205.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $100 = Total for medium "100" kennel:  $305   

Continental/United Total flight cost:  $304.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $109 = Total forover 9 lbs:  $413 

American Airlines Total flight cost:  $210.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $109 = Total for large "200" kennel:  $319   

Alaska Airlines flight cost:  $190.00 plus health certif/kennel/cups $100 = Total for medium "100"  kennel:  $290,  Total for large "200" kennel:  $299 

 

SHIPPING YOUR PUPPY OR KITTEN 

Whether you are buying a new puppy or kitten, taking a vacation with your pet or moving across country you may be faced with the issue of shipping live cargo through the airlines. Here is some "need to know" information to help your puppy or kitten have a successful trip. 

Requirements to Ship: 

Animals must be at least 8 weeks of age. 

Shipping kennel or cage must meet standards for size, ventilation, strength and design. 

Animals must have enough room to stand up and turn around. 

Kennels must be equipped with one food and water cup. 

Kennels must be marked with shipper's name, address and phone number and pick-up person's name, address and phone number (if different from shipper), 

Live Animal Stickers should be applied to the kennel and the last time fed and watered indicated. 

Place newspaper or absorbent material on the bottom of the crate. 

Animal may not be exposed to temperatures of less than 45 degrees Fahrenheit unless there is an acclimation statement by a Veterinarian. 

Health Certificate must be issued by a licensed Veterinarian and be no more than 10 days old. 

Animals may not be brought to the airline more than 4 hours before a flight. 

Animals less than 16 weeks of age must be offered food and water if transit is more than 12 hours. 

Older animals must have food at least every 24 hours and water at least every 12 hours. 

Animals over 16 weeks must have rabies shots current (12 weeks for out of USA flights). 

Things to Consider 

If shipping international (including Hawaii) check the quarantine laws. 

Do not give your pet solid food in the six hours before the flight. 

Do not give your pet sedation without your veterinarians approval. 

Try to schedule a non-stop flight and avoid heavy travel times. 

If you are flying with your pet, be sure to tell the flight attendant or pilot. 

Place a familiar blanket, or your pet's favorite toy in the kennel. 


As far as the registration papers, they are ordered at the time you pay for them, and mailed as soon as I get them.  There is no late fee with TICA, but AKC doest have late fees.  

SO, you are now fully informed, I hope.  I have tried to compile the most complete information
I can, mindful of ways to save money and still cover all of your bases, but if you have questions, please just ask.  If you have suggestions, please let me know.   

Thank you for your interest,  
Charlotte
___________________________________________________________________________________

        Also, here is great info written by my friend Ann Sowards on Palomar Mt....

        Wiener Puppy Rules
        

1) Never, EVER, let your new little wiener puppy roam at will around your house. He will be tragically confused and frightened, resulting in pooping and peeing in out of the way places (instinctively) and chewing everything in sight. You won’t be doing him or yourself any favors giving him “Freedom”. Keep him in a 4 foot pen with toys, water, food, a crate with a blanket and stuffed animal, and newspapers in one corner to do his business, and don’t let him out unless you intend to give him your undivided attention. Follow this rule religiously or I promise you your life will be hell.


2) NEVER hit your puppy. A firm “NO!” without use of his name will soon teach him you’re displeased. Ratchet it up with a waggle of the back of his neck, just like Mom. If he bites (and he will, frequently) say “No!” like you mean it and give him a toy to bite on instead. He’s just tasting you and desiring to teethe on something, but it’s your job to let him know human flesh is off limits. Don’t shove your finger down his throat with the thought he’ll gag and never bite on your finger again. He will, and meanwhile, would you like someone who did that to you? There are better ways.


3) Puppies have to pee and poop like everyone else. They will try to steer clear of their bedding and food and water. Give them a corner of their pen with newspaper, always leaving at first a little used pee paper beneath the fresh ones so it smells like the toilet, and they will return to it to use it again just like you do, think about it. When home and paying attention, take the little guy out 10 minutes or so after eating, set him on the same piece of ground each time, wait and wait and wait until he does his business, act like a fruitcake praising him to the skies, and take him in. Watch out for coyotes and hawks and owls, they live to snack on baby dogs.


4) Speaking of elimination, NEVER rub your pup's nose in it’s accidents. It’s rude, he will not understand the dubious point you think you’re making, and he’ll just avoid you as much as possible because…you’re nuts, basically. Puppies DO NOT associate your displeasure with their poop or pee unless it’s still running out of them as they squat when you start yelling, and you won’t be that fast, trust me. So just clean it up like you barely noticed, and move on. It’s your fault anyway for letting him run loose indoors when your attention is elsewhere, or for not taking him out frequently enough. If you let it happen enough, I can guarantee you he’ll never be house broken. So let him sit on the couch with you, not run on the floor.

5) Put a stuffed animal in his crate big enough to represent his Mom. Put his crate next to your bed at night. Talk to him quietly when he cries. Which he will, piteously for a few nights. If you succumb and haul him into bed with you, like most of us, make sure that’s what you really want, because it will be what HE really wants from there on out. Also make sure he doesn’t fall off or get rolled on. Your call. We’re all pretty weak on this one.


6) Just forget about EVER feeding him people food right now. (Except raw carrots can be a good and healthy substitute for your table food if you want to occupy him while you eat). He will never beg for it if you never give it to him in the first place. He won’t want it, he won’t miss it, you won’t be depriving him. It starts a lifetime of health and behavioral problems, trust me, I know, including huge dental bills. I paid 800 dollars to have 2 lousy teeth pulled just last year. It wasn’t because old Fritz was on a doggy kibble diet all these years, either. I have another dog who waits for something new to top yesterdays gourmet menu every night, and as a result is nearly classically anorexic. It is a hard habit for people and dogs to break. Just don’t start. By the way, dry kibble is all they need as long as they have plenty of water. It's good for little teeth, and do get a mini dachs mixture for puppies. Royal Canine is good. Just leave it out all day unless you’re home and paying attention, in which case it is an excellent advanced housebreaking and feeding technique to give them 20 minutes to get lunch down, then remove the bowl and wait 10 more, then take them outside to poo. I never got that good.


7) Don’t take puppies under 4 ½ months for walks. Their leg bones are not mature enough. Romping in the yard is enough for now. Their immune systems are not mature enough to ward off diseases they can pick up like Parvo and Distemper, too. Only about a couple of weeks or so after their 16 week shot would I take them into the world, or for a short walk. And if you take them in the car, use the crate. That’s so they don’t throw up all over your leather seats and brand new pants, which some of them do. Mercedes never misses an opportunity to barf in my car, and so do her pups. Fair warning. Baby wipes are standard car trip accessories.


8) Puppies get 3 to 4 shots, ending at about 16 weeks. They are not fully immunized until 2 weeks after that last booster. So keep them out of dog parks, the beach, off sidewalks and roads, out of stores, and away from neighborhood dogs until then. Keep them in a crate at the vet until you put them on the exam table. Then disinfect your hands at the vet, and your shoes, crate and car seat areas at home with a 1 part to 20--bleach to water solution. Parvovirus is a nasty, painful and expensive killer, as are several other EXTREMELY contagious diseases.

9) Puppies whine a lot. Be like their Mom…ignore it completely. It will stop sooner both in the short and long run. They pick up on “Poor baby!” faster than you can say it. When the whining stops, wait a minute, then pick them up if you want, and praise them.


10) Roll them on their backs during playtime once in a while and tickle them… it’s a submissive position that sends the message you are boss, without getting your ego all in a twist. That, and the fact that you feed them, you give them toys and take them away at will, and you are sooooo much bigger, all helps to make them understand their position in the food chain. Nothing more dramatic is required, so leave the whips and chains and uber-nazi dominance training manuals in the pet stores.


11) Never leave pups outside alone when it’s dark, or 1 hour after dawn, or 1 hour before dusk. Things hunt then. They hunt small dogs and cats, mostly. And those things are coyotes, and they are everywhere in San Diego, including downtown. I lived in Bay Park for a while by Mission Beach, and I used to see them early in the morning silently sail over a 6 foot fence with barbed wire on top into our backyard like gray ghosts. You don’t want that little 4 pound wiener puppy squatting helplessly in the grass right about then, because he’ll be toast even before your mouth falls completely open. Until pups reach about 7 lbs. they are also fair game for an owl or a hawk to grab and fly off with. Unless you have a lot of cover from trees or structures, you should always accompany your puppy outside to play or potty until he/she is over 6 lbs. They can literally be “gone in 60 seconds”!


12) Just remember, up to now your expensive (end result of careful breeding) has had Mom, brothers and sisters, and maybe aunts and uncles to share his little space with. He is not happy about being suddenly alone. You wouldn’t be either. He’s a social pack animal with social needs fine-tuned over hundreds of thousands of years...just like you. Help him over the hump. Play with him, praise him, be a quiet firm influence, and practice positive reinforcement. These puppy rules are all the result of years of making every single mistake possible. I pass on to you my painfully acquired wisdom, and if you follow these rules without fail, you will have a very rewarding relationship with a very good dog. If you don’t, don’t call me crying! And don’t blame the dog!


13) And finally, aren’t you glad you can watch “The Dog Whisperer” on the National Geographic Channel?

Happy Puppy Coming Home Day!  


Parvo
– Never give up!

Whether you are breeding dogs or rescuing them, Parvovirus is always talked about because of the impact of the virus on our puppies’ health.  If they contract the disease, it can be weeks before the puppy has recovered enough to move to a new home. Parvo causes more dollar loss than any other disease in kennels and rescues.  Parvovirus enteritis starts abruptly with anorexia and depression. It quickly progresses to vomiting and then diarrhea, if they do not die before that point. If a puppy is vomiting hard, it will often have little diarrhea until later in the course of the disease. Any dog with depression and GI signs should be considered to have Parvo, until it is proven to be something else. Delay in treatment results in death.
In 2006, Oklahoma State diagnosed Parvovirus 2c in the United States.  The 2c strain is very aggressive, leaving puppies so extremely sick that they often don’t want to raise their head, or just die quickly with few signs. As one breeder put it, the puppies have the “want to die” look that reminds you of the original Parvo. 2C Parvo is very quick incubation with exposure to clinical signs as quick as 3-4 days.
Where did we get Parvo:
The original Parvo crossed from cat Panleukopenia (a Parvo virus) and affected the gut of dogs.  We had Parvo in dogs that caused little issues so this new diarrhea Parvo was named Parvo 2, affecting only dogs.  The newer strains of Parvo, including 2A & B, reproduced in wildlife and cats, but still preferred canines. 2c Parvo will readily go back and forth to wildlife and cats where it reproduces and spreads. That gives the new strains a competitive advantage and keeps the wild virus in the environment. 
Vaccine Timing is Critical!  You can’t avoid Parvo in the kennel. You can keep the immunity higher than the wild virus and avoid seeing the disease!  You do that with vaccine timing and keeping the wild virus low with disinfection. Your goal is protection from puppy loss.
•     Evaluate the Parvo vaccine and disinfection protocol you are using and decide if you are positioned to prevent all Parvo strains.
•     Start vaccination early and be sure to give two Parvo vaccines, two weeks apart, one week before your puppies leave the kennel.
•     Rescue and humane kennels should strive to get Parvo and distemper in the dog before they breathe the kennel air.     
Timing is that important!
•     Keep your cats vaccinated in the kennel and avoid the issue. If the cat is vaccinated for feline distemper,          
Panleukopenia, they cannot get Canine Parvovirus.
    
Disinfect for Success!

Disinfectant contact time to kill the virus is important – some are 20 minutes and not practical. Trifectant®, Virkon, and
OXINE® work in seconds. Bleach should not be used around puppies, as it is one that was implicated in Fading Puppy
Syndrome along with the Quaternary ammonia family of disinfectants (Roccal). Puppy’s skin is translucent and they
absorb disinfectant quickly and can become toxic – they fade out.  

•     Trifectant® or Virkon – same thing. They penetrate organic matter and get the virus. This is the one often used to spray gravel runs once a week.


•     OXINE® is excellent as well and penetrates. You have to mix two products together and that is one extra step. OXINE is used in the food industry.  Fog with OXINE in pet shops targeting respiratory viruses. – Fogging is an excellent tool for managing a kennel cough outbreak!


•     Bleach is excellent, but you have to be an excellent cleaner as it will not penetrate. If you have smeared diarrhea or virus under smeared oil (Puppy food is high fat), Bleach will sterilize the surface but not the virus under it.


•     Use Health GuardTM in the laundry to protect the washer, yet get the Parvo virus out of towels.

Treatment:
If they get Parvo, the puppy dehydrates quickly. They are very painful from cramping and because Parvo wipes out the
lining of the gut, many bacteria are absorbed. White Blood Cell numbers are suppressed so they have little fight as well.
The treatment is straight forward.


•    Fluids and lots of them. We like Saline and add 50 cc of 50% Dextrose to get a 5% Dextrose solution. You will keep     
the glucose up and hydrate. Start with 5 ml/pound/twice a day and add any time you see diarrhea stool. Don’t forget     
to add the diarrhea loss on top of the 5 ml/lb – most forget this one. 2 Tablespoons of diarrhea needs 30 cc of fluid     
to replace.


•     Antibiotic to handle the absorbed bacteria and immune suppression. Tylosin is preferred as it is effective and helps  with the cramping. Don’t use Lincocin or Gentocin in babies that are dehydrated or you will damage the kidneys!


•     Slow and stop the vomiting. Reglan is preferred here, but several other products are also effective.  


•     Early feeding is very helpful in the recovery. As soon as puppies can handle it, start them on high fat/Protein food. Do  not use high carbohydrates or you get Clostridium overgrowth and sudden death. Many use all meat baby food or Royal Canine Recovery diet.  Keep them comfortable, disinfect around them, and provide lots of paper to remove any diarrhea stool when it happens. 


Never Give Up :
When Parvo happens you have to get aggressive as there are now millions of Parvo virus in the kennel.
•     Disinfect with Trifectant® or OXINE® – they penetrate cracks and kill the virus. Use Health GuardTM in laundry.
•     Move vaccine to 4-6-8 weeks starting with Parvo only vaccine at 4-6 weeks.
•     Every litter over 4 weeks and over 1 lb should be vaccinated immediately and booster given in two weeks.  
•     Put oral electrolytes (RE-SORB®) in front of all puppies from weaning to 8 weeks. Do this for all puppies for 30 days.  
Re-evaluate every week and stay aggressive for 90 days. It takes 90 days to feel comfortable the Parvo is under control
Stay aggressive with your vaccine program! Keep wild virus numbers low, immunity high in your kennel, and never give Parvo a place to live! 

The materials, information and answers provided through this article are not intended to replace the medical advice or services of a qualified veterinarian or other pet health care professional. Consult your own veterinarian for answers to specific medical questions, including diagnosis, treatment, therapy or medical attention. Not to be used without permission of Revival Animal Health. 

Thank you everyone, Purrs and wags,

Charlotte  

 

  

 A BREEDER'S TALE.

I love my little puppy, he makes my house a home,
He always is my best friend, I never feel alone.
He makes me smile, he makes me laugh, he fills my heart with love,
Did some breeder breed him? Was he sent from heaven above? 
I've never been a breeder, or seen life through their eyes
I hold my little puppy, just sit and criticise.
I've never know their anguish, I've never felt their pain,
The caring of their charges, through snow or wind or rain. 
I've never waited all night long for puppies to be born,
The stress and trepidation when they're still not there by dawn....
I've never felt the heartache of a little life in my hands,
A darling little puppy who weighs just 60 grams !! 
Should you do this instead of that? Or just pray to God?
Alone you fight, and hope one day he'll grow into a dog.
Bring joy to another being and make a house a home.
You know it's all just up to you, you fight this fight alone. 
Formula, bottle, heating pads you've got to get this right,
Two hourly feeds for this little mite throughout the day and night.
In your heart you know it, you'll surely lose the fight
To save this little baby, but God willing, you just might.... 
Day one he's in there fighting, you say a silent prayer,
Day two and three he's doing well, with lots of loving care
Day four and five - he's still alive your hopes soar to the heavens!
Day six he slips away again, dies in your hands day seven. 
You take this little angel and bury him alone,
With aching heart and burning tears, (and an exhausted groan),
You ask yourself, Why do this? Why suffer all the pain?
But see the joy that puppies bring - it really self explains! 
So, when you think of breeders and label them with "greed"
Think what they sometimes endure to fill anothers need
And when you buy a puppy, with pounds and pence you part.
You only pay with money........ 
We pay with our hearts. 

Author Unknown